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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    What is the life span of someone with Stage 4?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      It is difficult to tell with any stage of breast cancer. Some women with stage IV breast cancer live many, many years and others lose the fight too soon. The power of prayer and good physicians and treatment can help extend the life span. I do know that most times when cancer is detected...

      more

      It is difficult to tell with any stage of breast cancer. Some women with stage IV breast cancer live many, many years and others lose the fight too soon. The power of prayer and good physicians and treatment can help extend the life span. I do know that most times when cancer is detected early, the survival rate is dramatically increased.

      But I know of women with Stage IV breast cancer that have lived years after a diagnosis. I even read about a woman who had lived 17+ years. So, sorry about the ambiguous answer, but there is no set life span. It varies depending on the type of breast cancer and if/where it has spread.

      It's best to keep hope alive!

      1 comment
    • Lokomaikai Liz-t Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It really depends on where it has metastasized and the type of breast cancer you have - hormone receptors, etc. I was diagnosed with Stage IV, which had spread to my lungs, liver and bones - six years ago. Maintaining a positive attitude and staying spiritually strong in addition to having a...

      more

      It really depends on where it has metastasized and the type of breast cancer you have - hormone receptors, etc. I was diagnosed with Stage IV, which had spread to my lungs, liver and bones - six years ago. Maintaining a positive attitude and staying spiritually strong in addition to having a great support system and a good oncologist has helped me persevere.

      Comment
  • Nancy Wing Profile

    I was diagnosed with stage 0 DCIS. I had a single left mastectomy on 11/8/11. I am so scared it is going to happen on the other side. I started on tomaxifin to help reduce my risk. Does anyone know what the chances are it can happen on the other side?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    about 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Donna Gray Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision....

      more

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision. Best of luck to you.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is...

      more

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is no perfect treatment or "cure" for breast cancer even with mastectomies it us impossible to get all the breast tissue out unless they go back to the radical mastectomies of the old days. Main thing is to be your own advocate make sure you continue to have mammograms or breast ultrasounds. Early detection saves lifes. We all have in the back of our minds the "what if it comes back" thought. Even those that are 20 and 30 year survivors. Remember you are a survivor, and always try to stay positive. Don't let the negative thoughts interfere in a productive happy life. I always say no matter what there is something to be thankful for every day take care

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    WHAT CANCER CANNOT DO: Cancer is so limited...It cannot cripple love. It cannot shatter hope. It cannot corrode faith. It cannot destroy peace. It cannot kill friendship. It cannot suppress memories. It cannot silence courage.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      That's awesome Norma, thanks so much for sharing. Very encouraging!

      1 comment
    • Renee' OK Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I love this. Thanks for sharing.

      1 comment
  • André Roberts Profile

Educational Video

Personal Story

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An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

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