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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Maria Crespo Profile

    Does it hurt when they put in the port

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 4 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      My port was placed at the same time as my mastectomy. The area was sore for a while. I know some women get it placed and have chemo the same day. I've had it for 2 years now, and don't even know it's there. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Mine was some under general anesthetic so I was sleeping. Didn't feel a thing.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Tomorrow a year ago, I knew I had cancer. This year was insightful, husband at first walked out, Christian friends, well - they were anything but. Good doctors and good plan. But still scared and glad to have found this side. I value life more than ever.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I'm so sorry, for your diagnosis. And for your husband walking out on you. That's so wrong in every way. You truly find out who you true friends are when cancer comes around. I lost a few "so called" friends my self. But I also found new friends that truly stepped up to the plate when I needed...

      more

      I'm so sorry, for your diagnosis. And for your husband walking out on you. That's so wrong in every way. You truly find out who you true friends are when cancer comes around. I lost a few "so called" friends my self. But I also found new friends that truly stepped up to the plate when I needed them. I'm diana welcome to our boards, there are a lot of awesome women here, if you need to talk, we'll be here for you, Hugs, Diana

      Comment
    • Renee' OK Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes indeed. I feel your pain. It will get better and the strength you will gain is unmeasurable. Peace and healing to you!

      Comment
  • Heather Cash Profile

    What is the best treatment for Stage 2 Breast Cancer in a 20 year old girl?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Heather,
      It all depends on what type of breast cancer, how aggressive, what stage, etc. There is a lot that goes into the decision for the best treatment plan for breast cancer in any woman at any age. It isn't so cut and dried. It will probably be a combination of surgery, chemotherapy,...

      more

      Heather,
      It all depends on what type of breast cancer, how aggressive, what stage, etc. There is a lot that goes into the decision for the best treatment plan for breast cancer in any woman at any age. It isn't so cut and dried. It will probably be a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and possibly some long term hormone therapy. WIth a breast cancer in such a young woman, there may be a genetic component to it. If she has siblings, she might talk to her oncologist about genetic testing for her sibs. When she is going to any of her appointments in this diagnosis phase, she should be accompanied by a family member to take notes and help her remember what was said. She will probably be is the complete shock stage and needs a lot of support.
      Take care, Sharon

      4 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Agree totally with Sharon. I was stage 2 and that's a scary place to be. All options must be considered and in my case removal of the offending turmor was first before it got so large and had an opportunity to invade the lymph system. I would be asking why age had anything to do with treatment...

      more

      Agree totally with Sharon. I was stage 2 and that's a scary place to be. All options must be considered and in my case removal of the offending turmor was first before it got so large and had an opportunity to invade the lymph system. I would be asking why age had anything to do with treatment plans. Cancer doesn't care how old you are. It is heartbreaking for a young person but it makes it all the more important to attack the disease with everything at hand so a long, healthy life is the prognosis. Good luck. Be sure to look at the little learn section on this site along with what Sharon has already suggested. Hugs to a worried Mom. Jo ;-)

      1 comment
  • Deborah Baker Profile

    How long does it take for hair to grow back? Last treatment was 2 weeks ago...

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Deborah,
      I wish I could tell you how long it will take but it won't be soon unfortunately. It took my hair about 8 months to really show growth that actually looked like I --might-- have just chosen a really, really, short haircut. Arrrrgh! My hair normally grows very quickly but didn't after...

      more

      Deborah,
      I wish I could tell you how long it will take but it won't be soon unfortunately. It took my hair about 8 months to really show growth that actually looked like I --might-- have just chosen a really, really, short haircut. Arrrrgh! My hair normally grows very quickly but didn't after chemo. Like everything else, it is an individual with each woman. I don't know if there is anything you can do to speed it along either. I guess you just have to be very thankful, you are done with your chemo every time you look in a mirror. Glad you are done. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Francine Williams Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I finish Chemo in June and my hair is so pretty and curly it's looks as if that's how I cut it!!I'm so proud to rock it like this.So give it sometime and b4 u know it it will be sprouting all over ur head!!

      Comment

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