loading... close

Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Jackie Valencia Profile

    How long can you live with stage 4 breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Dear Jackie,

      If you go to Adjuvant! Online - make sure you have obtained a copy of your histopathology report and have it beside you - register on the site - anyone can register as a Dr - its not illegal to do so - and get your log on - confirm your log on via your email - then log into...

      more

      Dear Jackie,

      If you go to Adjuvant! Online - make sure you have obtained a copy of your histopathology report and have it beside you - register on the site - anyone can register as a Dr - its not illegal to do so - and get your log on - confirm your log on via your email - then log into Adjuvant! Online again, put in your log on name and password, click on breast cancer, input all your stats from your histopathology report and hey presto, up comes the survival stats for your particular situation. You can play with the reporting data by selecting different treatments to see what stats come up - which ones extend life and those that don't. You can also present your stats in different ways eg., how long the disease statistically reduces ones overall lifespan, how long statistically as breast cancer specific free, and so on. I found Adjuvant! Online the most useful tool especially as many on line forums on this issue tend to present [to my mind] overly optimistic anecdotes because of course only those who survive are here to post. Similarly I found most health care professionals prefer to turn themselves inside out than give a straight forward answer. Their usual line is everyone is different/what would be know/it depends - then they always tell you some uplifting anecdote about someone who is still going after 23 years! That of course is true - as far as it goes - but the reality is the survival stats are well established and while there can be enormous variation, some patients such as myself find it enormously informative and empowering to know exactly what the stats say is the normal or average course of my disease. Patients right to know is not , however, given the respect legally,ethically and morally entitled due. If you are over 18 and not so mentally ill you cannot make rational decisions for yourself, if you want to know this information, then you are entitled to it.

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jackie, I'm stage IIIc and have spoken to several stage IV ladies that have been living with cancer for years. There's an awesome discussion group on breastcancer.org that has helped me a great deal. It's nice to be able to share your story with someone that's been in your shoes. The ladies...

      more

      Hi Jackie, I'm stage IIIc and have spoken to several stage IV ladies that have been living with cancer for years. There's an awesome discussion group on breastcancer.org that has helped me a great deal. It's nice to be able to share your story with someone that's been in your shoes. The ladies there are awesome.

      2 comments
  • Carla Victor-rawson Profile

    Help, what do I do about radiation burn? I'm only at the 3 week point and I'm just starting to feel it and my breast is pink. Does this happen so early ? I am using a cream that contains aloe & vitamin E ... Don't think it's enough

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      When everything else gave me me a rash I was given samples of lindiskin soothing balm. It worked and no rash. Www. Lindiskin.com

      Comment
    • Lynn H Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Aquafor cream works really well. You can buy it almost anywhere

      1 comment
  • Alissa Dawson Profile
  • Thumb avatar default

    I already have breast cancer. There is another lesion you can see it on ultrasound but not MRI should I be worried?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • NancyStradley- Pezzi Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Breathe. If it is something they have caught it, if its nothing then you would be stressing for not. This is all scary. Prayers to you. And a big hug.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Cate,
      So you already have learned you have breast cancer. This other lesion shows up with an ultrasound but NOT with MRI. The following describes how my cancerous tumor looked on an MRI. It lit up like a Christmas tree light bulb. It was was so bright, I swear is was clearly visible from...

      more

      Cate,
      So you already have learned you have breast cancer. This other lesion shows up with an ultrasound but NOT with MRI. The following describes how my cancerous tumor looked on an MRI. It lit up like a Christmas tree light bulb. It was was so bright, I swear is was clearly visible from Mars! Cancerous tumors absorb the contrast dye injected into you. That is how they are detected and show so well on an MRI. It doesn't sound like this is a cancerous lesion. I WOULD ask for a biopsy but could this just be a non-cancerous cyst and they are calling it a "lesion"? I would be climbing into the backseat of their car until they told me what that thing was. Of course.... that's just hysterical me. You have to be your own best advocate so go get them darlin' and ask for a clarification. Blessings.... take care, Sharon

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 2

Inspire hope by becoming an advocate for breast cancer prevention.

spread the word