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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 2 - Why?

- Why do I have breast cancer?
- What could I have done differently?

There are some questions that cannot be answered; even so, they are not unreasonable questions to ask. Most people ask them. Just remember, doctors almost never pin down a single, precise cause for cancer.

It is very important to educate yourself about what’s ahead. By doing this, you will keep loved ones informed and help ease your own concern.

A support team of your family, friends and other breast cancer patients is extremely important. They will strengthen you through this season and encourage to make the most of your life, today.

You also have your medical team; this will typically include your personal physician, surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiologist and others. Their attention, care, and expertise are aimed at diagnosing and treating breast cancer in a way that is most effective for you.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I just wanted to say that you all have been such an inspiration to me. It helps so much to know that I am not alone in this battle. Thank you all for sharing your experiences and tips to try to help with side effects. Thanks for all the support!!! ;)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      We are a sisterhood who understands what it is like to go through the breast cancer journey! We keep it real when it needs to be, but most of all, we give each other hope! Keep the questions coming and let us know how you are doing. We care about you!

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I used to do mammograms and I've been very inspired by this site, so happy I found it. Take care of yourself, Betti

      Comment
  • Giselle dominguez  Profile

    My mom was recently told she was in stage 2 of breast cancer - I'm really scared and want to know how bad is stage 2?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Janice Baker Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Its going to be okay. I am a survivor that was diagnosed with stage 3c. I have completed surgery, chemo and radiation. My cancer also went into my lymph nodes. I'm praying for you and your mom.

      1 comment
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast...

      more

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast cancer or your mom is younger than 40, you might talk to your doctor (&/or hers) about genetic testing. They have identified gene mutations that drastically increase your risk of breast & ovarian cancer. I don't mean to freak you out or imply that anyone in your family has one of these gene mutations, I am merely passing on information that might prove helpful.

      Like Diana, I recommend your mom get in touch with other women who have or have survived breast cancer. She may meet some during treatment or you can help her search for a local support group.

      And at 10 weeks pregnant, your mom has plenty of time to enjoy your pregnancy! If she begins chemo treatments or undergoes surgery soon, I'm sure just thinking about you & that little one will lift her spirits & help her fight. You ladies can get through this! I'll keep you all in my most positive of thoughts.
      Sending Love!

      1 comment
  • Alysia Krafel Profile

    I just got my diagnosis, Stage 1 invasive ductal tumor. I am overwhelmed with anxiety. Has this happened to any of you folks?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 6 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Hi Alysia, Let me say first, if you suffer from anxiety and you don't already take a little pill to help with that, call your doctor and ask for it. I was formally diagnosed with Stage 2A invasive ductal cancer with a 2.7 cm turmor that we all could see and feel in March. When my visit to the...

      more

      Hi Alysia, Let me say first, if you suffer from anxiety and you don't already take a little pill to help with that, call your doctor and ask for it. I was formally diagnosed with Stage 2A invasive ductal cancer with a 2.7 cm turmor that we all could see and feel in March. When my visit to the oncology surgeon for a consultation was ended with core biopsies at the end of the day in his office, I told him I had to have something to get me to the surgery. He asked me what I had used in the past and he smiled and said he could do that and prescribed me 15 mild zanex. BLESS HIS HEART. I too, suffer from anxiety so I know how you feel. Waiting is surreal. I felt like I had awakened in someone else's nightmare. My husband and I had just retired, rekindled our marriage and having a great life-enter cancer. So, stick with us, ask all your questions, read the little learn section on this site and you'll scoot right through this. Hang tough, get your meds, and talk it out if that takes the edge off. Hugs and peace to you tonight. Jo :-D

      2 comments
    • Kansas Girl  Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I was diagnosed on Sept 6 with IDC - Stage 1. I'm 42 - was found on my annual mammogram. Absolutely no history of any type of cancer in my family. I had a lumpectomy on Oct. 22 and sentinel node biopsy. I fortunately do not have any node involvement. I'm triple positive and have completed 2 of 6...

      more

      I was diagnosed on Sept 6 with IDC - Stage 1. I'm 42 - was found on my annual mammogram. Absolutely no history of any type of cancer in my family. I had a lumpectomy on Oct. 22 and sentinel node biopsy. I fortunately do not have any node involvement. I'm triple positive and have completed 2 of 6 chemo treatments. Then will have radiation. I was completely blindsided and completed overwhelmed with the diagnosis. Still am on many days. We are fortunate -stage 1 is very treatable and very curable. You are very fortunate it was caught early. This is a great site and I thank God that I found it. It has helped tremendously.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Can the size of the cancer diagnosed change between diagnosis and time of surgery?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 3 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      I believe the tests for diagnose may not be exact in diagnosing the size of the tumor. After surgery the pathology will give you an accurate size of the tumor, having been removed and studied. As far as the size changing due to the wait between diagnosis and surgery, that is most probably...

      more

      I believe the tests for diagnose may not be exact in diagnosing the size of the tumor. After surgery the pathology will give you an accurate size of the tumor, having been removed and studied. As far as the size changing due to the wait between diagnosis and surgery, that is most probably minimal. Just be sure that once the process has been started there are no unnecessary delays. Hope this helps!

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I agree with Sharon. Sooner the better for sure, but you will have exact measurements after surgery. Prayers to you.

      Comment

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