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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 2 - Standard Treatment & Clinical Trials

Before selecting your treatment plan, you should first understand the difference between standard treatment and clinical trials.

Standard treatments are methods that experts agree are appropriate, accepted and widely used. These standard procedures have proven useful in fighting breast cancer in the past. A clinical trial, on the other hand, is an approved research study that some doctors believe has a strong potential to improve standard treatments. When clinical trials demonstrate better results than the standard, that new treatment becomes the standard. Remember, all our current standards were clinical trials at one time.

If a clinical trial is an option for you, your doctor will explain the possible trade-offs with the trial treatment versus standard treatment. Together with your medical team, you will need to decide what treatment method is the best for you and your health.

Let’s look more closely at the standard treatments your doctors may recommend.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I was diagnosed Friday with Invasive ductal carcinoma. Is it a given I will lose my breast? I fear losing my breast, I like them both.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Cindy Smalley Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Sorry hit enter too soon. Tumor was small enough. I had chemotherapy because some lymph nodes were positive, now am doing radiation. Your surgeon will give you your treatment plan. So for now the answer is maybe or maybe not depending on your circumstances. Best wishes. Sorry it should have...

      more

      Sorry hit enter too soon. Tumor was small enough. I had chemotherapy because some lymph nodes were positive, now am doing radiation. Your surgeon will give you your treatment plan. So for now the answer is maybe or maybe not depending on your circumstances. Best wishes. Sorry it should have said IDC not IFC.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Traci,
      So sorry this has happened. It is a shock and then some. As for what type of surgery, a mastectomy ISN'T a for-sure! I had a choice between a lumpectomy and a mastectomy. Many women on this board also had the same choice. Treatments vary depending on which surgery you choose but the...

      more

      Traci,
      So sorry this has happened. It is a shock and then some. As for what type of surgery, a mastectomy ISN'T a for-sure! I had a choice between a lumpectomy and a mastectomy. Many women on this board also had the same choice. Treatments vary depending on which surgery you choose but the statistics for successful outcomes are the same. You have a lot of diagnostics to go through before you have the entire picture. This is mentally a tough time because you don't have all the facts yet. I also had IDC and was diagnosed 5 years ago this month. I remain cancer free.... I chose to have a mastectomy, also had chemo and 5 years of hormone blocking drug. Hang in there.... you will make it. Lots of great women on this board.... a great big sisterhood! Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • abhilasha barla Profile

    I have lumps on my right breast..is it any sign of breast cancer..

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      You need to make an appointment to see your doctor as some testing may need to be done. Lumps aren't always felt with breast cancer; I had 2 areas seen on my yearly mammogram that hadn't been seen previously, and neither one produced a lump so I wouldn't have felt anything during my monthly BSE.

      Comment
    • Mandana K. Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It is better to show it to a doctor,without imaging no one can speak about it.

      Comment
  • Kay Brouse Profile

    First, it was just chemo after the bilateral. Now, it's a different set of chemo and radiation. At this point, the psychological blows have me reeling more than the disease itself. Everything feels so completely out of control. Very frustrated...

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I feel for you! The cancer journey is an emotional roller coaster! We understand the feeling of

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Kay,
      The good thing about diagnosis is it is an everchanging work in progress. They are tailor-making the treatment for you and those rotten cells you want to get rid of. We can completely understand the fear that goes along with uncertainty. It is the worst. Once they settle on a course of...

      more

      Kay,
      The good thing about diagnosis is it is an everchanging work in progress. They are tailor-making the treatment for you and those rotten cells you want to get rid of. We can completely understand the fear that goes along with uncertainty. It is the worst. Once they settle on a course of treatment, you have a definite path. I would grab whoever is the leader of the team and settle him/her down for a serioius talk. This storm you are trying to ride out right now will get better. Your emotional trip is a rocky one, but you will make it. Hang in there darlin' it will smooth out. Big brave hugs to you, take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • karyn johnson Profile

    I recently finished round 3 of T/C. Now I am having a ton of muscle twitches. Mostly around my eyes. Is this Chemo related???

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Patient

      Yes I had same thing ! My one eye kept twitching ! It is related to chemo'i believe and I also got hiccups strange things I learned about chemo along the way.

      1 comment
    • Carol Narramore Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I experienced that too. It too a couple of months to go away

      1 comment

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