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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 2 - Standard Treatment & Clinical Trials

Before selecting your treatment plan, you should first understand the difference between standard treatment and clinical trials.

Standard treatments are methods that experts agree are appropriate, accepted and widely used. These standard procedures have proven useful in fighting breast cancer in the past. A clinical trial, on the other hand, is an approved research study that some doctors believe has a strong potential to improve standard treatments. When clinical trials demonstrate better results than the standard, that new treatment becomes the standard. Remember, all our current standards were clinical trials at one time.

If a clinical trial is an option for you, your doctor will explain the possible trade-offs with the trial treatment versus standard treatment. Together with your medical team, you will need to decide what treatment method is the best for you and your health.

Let’s look more closely at the standard treatments your doctors may recommend.

Related Questions

  • Karen Milburn Profile

    Chemo on Thursday and a shot in Friday to have bone marrow to start making white blood cells. What was your worst day after your chemo treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 5 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Everyone reacts differently. Take the nausea meds as directed, don't wait until you feel sick. Day 1, nausea, Day 2 and 3, worst days, tired, nausea, flu like symptoms, joint pain from the shot Day 4, got better. 5 very few symptoms, but still tired. BUT it was doable!!! And 10 years...

      more

      Everyone reacts differently. Take the nausea meds as directed, don't wait until you feel sick. Day 1, nausea, Day 2 and 3, worst days, tired, nausea, flu like symptoms, joint pain from the shot Day 4, got better. 5 very few symptoms, but still tired. BUT it was doable!!! And 10 years later... still no evidence of cancer!!! Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate and eat small amounts at a time. Wishing you minimal side effects!!! BUT it was doable!!! And 10 years later... still no evidence of cancer!!! Keep the questions coming, we are here for you!

      1 comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I had chemo on wed, shot on thurs. Sat and sun were my worst. I had muscle aches and bone pain from the shot. Take Claritin, it helps. You can do this! Prayers to you.

      1 comment
  • gima green Profile

    Does anyone wish they made a different decision on treatment and why?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      No, I did everything the doctors recommended as I plan on living a very long time. Of course my brain goes back to 3 years ago when I got my diagnosis at times since I'm still seeing my team on occasion and elected to leave my port in so go in every 6 weeks to get if accessed and flushed but...

      more

      No, I did everything the doctors recommended as I plan on living a very long time. Of course my brain goes back to 3 years ago when I got my diagnosis at times since I'm still seeing my team on occasion and elected to leave my port in so go in every 6 weeks to get if accessed and flushed but life is good.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      No!! Not one minute because I'm alive to enjoy the hard work of treatment. My life since treatment has been challenging but every time my husband holds my hand, our son sits down to visit for a few minutes, our friends smile and hug me and say "We are glad your here." I love my life and I'm...

      more

      No!! Not one minute because I'm alive to enjoy the hard work of treatment. My life since treatment has been challenging but every time my husband holds my hand, our son sits down to visit for a few minutes, our friends smile and hug me and say "We are glad your here." I love my life and I'm very thankful I'm here.

      Comment
  • nicky doyle Profile

    Hi all, I'm 27 yrs old from Ireland im scheduled for a mastectomy, then chemo and radiation would love to have contact with someone around my age whos gone or going through treatment

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Brooke Lancaster Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Hi Nicky, I am 33, was diagnosed at 32. I just finished my 6 rounds of chemo 3 weeks ago and starting radiation next week. I was diagnosed 2 A. Triple negative. I did pretty good thru chemo. No nausea, just very tired, and it went really fast. Can't believe I am done. Hang in there and u will get...

      more

      Hi Nicky, I am 33, was diagnosed at 32. I just finished my 6 rounds of chemo 3 weeks ago and starting radiation next week. I was diagnosed 2 A. Triple negative. I did pretty good thru chemo. No nausea, just very tired, and it went really fast. Can't believe I am done. Hang in there and u will get thru it. Stay strong and positive. Remember it's all mind over matter.

      Comment
    • Lucy Whiten Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi. I'm 32 and was diagnosed sept 2011 while my husband was in Afghanistan. I've had my first lot of chemo followed by another 5 cycles I'm then having a masectomy and reconstruction then radiotherapy. I can't believe how many strong women there are out there going through the same thing. It...

      more

      Hi. I'm 32 and was diagnosed sept 2011 while my husband was in Afghanistan. I've had my first lot of chemo followed by another 5 cycles I'm then having a masectomy and reconstruction then radiotherapy. I can't believe how many strong women there are out there going through the same thing. It really touches my heart. Stay strong like me :-) x

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I had lumpectomy with one node removed. How long does it take to know if I am going to have lymphedema. I have some swelling above the node biopsy incision. It has been 16 days since surgery.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • jennifer lewis Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      You can get lymphedema anytime. It could show up right away or years from now or never. Just be aware of anything unusual and massage the area regularly.

      Comment
    • Mimi Carroll Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would take bets with one node gone the rest will just take over and you will have no problems... Do some gentle lymph massage to help it flow..

      2 comments

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