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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • abhilasha barla Profile

    I have lumps on my right breast..is it any sign of breast cancer..

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      You need to make an appointment to see your doctor as some testing may need to be done. Lumps aren't always felt with breast cancer; I had 2 areas seen on my yearly mammogram that hadn't been seen previously, and neither one produced a lump so I wouldn't have felt anything during my monthly BSE.

      Comment
    • Mandana K. Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It is better to show it to a doctor,without imaging no one can speak about it.

      Comment
  • gima green Profile

    My lymphocytes and monocytes are very low after radiation. Lymphocytes 0.8 and momocytes 0.1. Should I be concern?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 3 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      What does your doctor have to say? This is definitely a question that needs to be brought up with him/her. It may be a side effect of the overall treatment but we can't really tell you why it's like it is or if it is detrimental. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      That is a doctor's question.

      Comment
  • sally go Profile

    How long will one live with Stage 4 invasive ductal cancer without going through treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • elyssa m Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      A person has cancer. Cancer dosnt have a person. Remember that stay positive and may god bless you:)

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone had or received chemo in 6 weeks in order to avoid loosing hair? (versus a 4 week cycle)

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      DOn't think it matters much. Your hair will still come out. Once I finally understood it, I didn't mind it so much. Chemo attacks rapidly dividing cells and destroys them. Therefore cancer is destroyed (hopefully) because it's composed of rapidly dividing cells. The hair on your head is the...

      more

      DOn't think it matters much. Your hair will still come out. Once I finally understood it, I didn't mind it so much. Chemo attacks rapidly dividing cells and destroys them. Therefore cancer is destroyed (hopefully) because it's composed of rapidly dividing cells. The hair on your head is the most rapidly growing hair on your body which is why it falls out first and completely. Eyebrows and eyelashes take longer and sometimes don't fall out entirely...hair on the rest of your body may never fall out. Anyway, it's unavoidable and I think it's a sign that the chemo is doing what it needs to. Most of us here feel that once it's gone it's not such a big deal. It's actually sort of liberating!!!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I haven't heard of it. I lost my hair after the first treatment. My reservation would be the fear that altering the regular frequency of treatment just to try to save my hair might come back to bite me in the future. Will the chemotherapy be as effective with the administration of it in this...

      more

      I haven't heard of it. I lost my hair after the first treatment. My reservation would be the fear that altering the regular frequency of treatment just to try to save my hair might come back to bite me in the future. Will the chemotherapy be as effective with the administration of it in this unorthodox way? It is traumatic to lose your hair but would my vanity win out over the wisdom of standard treatment? (HECK NO!) Breast cancer is a formidable enemy and it plays sneaky and tough. Being bald is temporary, there are many ways to deal with it.... wigs, scarves, hats, or even "going commando." I wouldn't chance it. As Traciann says... "It's the drug." Sharon

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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