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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • robbin  slay Profile

    What is the average cost for breast cancer treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Robin,
      It depends on what kind of treatment. I know with lumpectomy, radiation, and six chemotherapies, and many, many prescription medications, the cost for my treatment was over $200000. I was fortunate to have good insurance to cover it all.

      Comment
    • Mary Boone Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Too much..

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Can a person still have get cancer in there lymph nodes under the under arms after a mastectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Dear Norma,
      Yes. I had 5 sentinel nodes removed but the surgeon warned me there was a small chance I could have cancer cells in any of my axillary nodes. Again the chance was very small. Since I am 5 years out now, I am fairly sure they were ok since I have not had a recurrance. Every time I...

      more

      Dear Norma,
      Yes. I had 5 sentinel nodes removed but the surgeon warned me there was a small chance I could have cancer cells in any of my axillary nodes. Again the chance was very small. Since I am 5 years out now, I am fairly sure they were ok since I have not had a recurrance. Every time I have gone to my oncologist or internist, they have always checked my axillary lymph nodes for any swelling. Breast cancer is so very sneaky, I would not be surprised for it to raise its ugly head somewhere, sometime in my life. Arrrgh. God willing, I hope not. God's blessings to you, take care, Norma, Sharon

      1 comment
    • vicki e Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      I had a mastectomy five years ago and hada recurrence in my lymph nodes this past February so the short answer is yes . Unfortunately.

      3 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    When do I schedule the oncologist?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Your surgeon should give you a referral to oncologist other wise see you gp

      Comment
  • christina cappa Profile

    If diagnosed with Stage 1 cancer, what kind of surgery should I expect?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Yashmira Devine Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Hi Christina,
      I was diagnosed in August, I had a bilateral mastectomy, no chemo, no rads, lymph nodes were negative, and have been recommended for tamoxifen for 5 years. Sharon is right, everyone is different so your treatment recommendations will be different.
      Good luck to you and remember to...

      more

      Hi Christina,
      I was diagnosed in August, I had a bilateral mastectomy, no chemo, no rads, lymph nodes were negative, and have been recommended for tamoxifen for 5 years. Sharon is right, everyone is different so your treatment recommendations will be different.
      Good luck to you and remember to rely on family and friends for help, support, literally. Have someone go with you to your doctor appointments, there is SO MUCH info that is being given to you, you have questions and you may go numb and forget to ask them. The person that goes with you should possibly have a notebook to write down all the info so that you can absorb it better when you are home.
      Again, GOOD LUCK.
      Yashmira

      Comment
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I had a lumpectomy and 16 radiation treatments. No lymph involvement so no chemo.

      Comment

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