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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Peter P Profile

    do you believe there should male breast cancer awareness and education programs made available for men and their partners?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes, definitely do! I don't think enough men are aware that they can get breast cancer. And I have read about doctors dismissing their male patients or misdiagnosing them... and then what occurs, is the cancer is found in a late stage. This time of year is the perfect time for people to help...

      more

      Yes, definitely do! I don't think enough men are aware that they can get breast cancer. And I have read about doctors dismissing their male patients or misdiagnosing them... and then what occurs, is the cancer is found in a late stage. This time of year is the perfect time for people to help bring more awareness by writing an article for your local newspaper, congressman, etc.

      Comment
    • Peter P Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thanks Diana. I live in Canada. I found a small lump in my left breast the the week of June. I was operated on September 1, complete mastectomy and Sentinel lymph node. I was advised yesterday that I have to back in 2 weeks for another surgery to remove more lymph nodes. Then chemo and/ or...

      more

      Thanks Diana. I live in Canada. I found a small lump in my left breast the the week of June. I was operated on September 1, complete mastectomy and Sentinel lymph node. I was advised yesterday that I have to back in 2 weeks for another surgery to remove more lymph nodes. Then chemo and/ or radiation. Very discouraging but i am glad I'm alive.

      3 comments
  • Robert Hays Profile

    How does a man know if he has breast cancer, does he have lumps and tenderness

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Robert,

      My brother-in-law was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. He was having some pain in his breast, felt the area and found a lump. He tried to look at it in the mirror, rubbed the lump and had some discharge from his nipple. He was being seen by his doctor for something else the...

      more

      Robert,

      My brother-in-law was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. He was having some pain in his breast, felt the area and found a lump. He tried to look at it in the mirror, rubbed the lump and had some discharge from his nipple. He was being seen by his doctor for something else the next week and mentioned it to his doctor. Doctor referred him for a mammogram, which confirmed a couple of suspicious lumps. He had an ultrasound, a biopsy which diagnosed infiltrating ductal carcinoma.... (JUST like mine!!!) He had a mastectomy, and a oncoDX test was made of the tissue. An oncoDX test is a predictor is the cancer was the type that would likely reoccur, thus recommending treatment with chemotherapy. The scale is from 0 to 100. 0 = no reoccurrence 100= will reoccur. His score was -0- so he was done with his treatment!!! Anyway.... even though breast cancer is relatively rare in men, it can still happen. The symptoms are the same. If you have a lump in your breast..... man-up and have it checked!!! This site or breastcancer.org. will have symptoms of breast cancer. Early detection is the key to getting rid of this sneaky disease. Hang in there... Take care, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I would go to ur gp. Let them check it out. What I have learnt is that it's different for everyone.

      Comment
  • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile

    Awesome blog by one of us. She's an inspiration. http://lisabadams.com/

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    almost 6 years 2 answers
    • jan bursky Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thank you. I highly recommend this. Definitely worth reading.

      Comment
    • Lisa G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Thank you for the info..it was really helpful..take care

      Comment
  • Charles P Profile

    Any information on men with cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Charles,
      My brother-in-law was diagnosed last December with the same type of breast cancer I had. It started out with a pain in his chest near his nipple. When he rubbed it, he felt a lump, when pressed, fluid came out of his nipple. He was being treated for an injury and had an appointment...

      more

      Charles,
      My brother-in-law was diagnosed last December with the same type of breast cancer I had. It started out with a pain in his chest near his nipple. When he rubbed it, he felt a lump, when pressed, fluid came out of his nipple. He was being treated for an injury and had an appointment with his doctor that week. The doctor checked it and referred him to a breast center for a mammogram. From the mammogram, he had an ultrasound, and biopsy which confirmed it was breast cancer. Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC). He had a mastectomy and a OncoDX test on the tumor. He had 2 sentinel lymph nodes removed and they were cancer free. It was discovered, it (the tumor) contained the type of tumor cells that were not going to reoccur. His Onco score was -0- At that point, his oncologist sent him on his way with no further treatment would be needed. Essentially, my brother-in-law was treated just as a woman would be treated. If the Onco test would have come back a higher score.... in the 20's, it would have meant he needed chemotherapy to help prevent the cancer from coming back. It was just very lucky my brother-in-law was man enough to get it checked. He works in law enforcement so for him, it was highly embarrassing to say he had breast cancer. It turned out he was poster-boy for men who have breast cancer. IT'S CANCER for God's sake! It doesn't matter where it strikes, it's a nasty, sneaky disease. You must have something in your breast or armpit that does not feel normal. The best thing to do today is call your doctor, make an appointment to have it checked. If this turns out to be breast cancer, the sooner you have it treated, the better. Please keep in touch with us, Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I just finished chemo- I had 6 rounds. I'm not going to lie.. It slowed me down for days 3-5 of my chemo. I scheduled it on Wednesdays- that worked for me so I could take it easy on the weekends. Everybody is different- just honor your body! Let us know any other questions!

      Comment

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