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I'm meeting with an oncologist for the first time, what should I ask?

Christy Murphy Profile
Asked by

anonymous

Learning About Breast Cancer about 8 years
 
  • Alice Eisele Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2009
    First, bring an notebook and a friend or family member to take notes for you. You'll want to know what are your options for treatment. What will be the side effects from these treatments? Do you qualify for a clinical trial? A great book is "100 questions & answers about Breast Cancer" by Harold P. Freeman, MD. Most of all, remember, it's your life. Take time to make the best descisions for you and your family. Hope it goes well.
    about 8 years Flag
    • Joan Rosov Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      The above comment is "right on". Don't let yourself be rushed into treatment. Do your homework. If your have only limited time, use this website and find out about radiation,chem and the different types of surgery available, so that when the MD...

      more

      The above comment is "right on". Don't let yourself be rushed into treatment. Do your homework. If your have only limited time, use this website and find out about radiation,chem and the different types of surgery available, so that when the MD starts discussing your options you will be a little aware of what he referring to. GOOD LUCK

      about 8 years Flag
    • Daphne Beitman Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Most definitely. My husband and my mother went with me, and I'm so glad they did. Within the first 5 minutes I felt very overwhelmed and was in tears. I'm not sharing this to scare anyone, but doctors in general have a sense of detachment because...

      more

      Most definitely. My husband and my mother went with me, and I'm so glad they did. Within the first 5 minutes I felt very overwhelmed and was in tears. I'm not sharing this to scare anyone, but doctors in general have a sense of detachment because they do what they do every day, seeing hundreds of patients.

      about 8 years Flag
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Work out your patient personality type and tell the Oncologist what your preference is for your interaction. I am pure stats, numbers and studies through and through so I told him my surgeon told me I had a choice between a female Oncologist hand...

      more

      Work out your patient personality type and tell the Oncologist what your preference is for your interaction. I am pure stats, numbers and studies through and through so I told him my surgeon told me I had a choice between a female Oncologist hand holder who was great with distressed women or a crusty old Professor who had no bedside manner and told it to patients with both barrels. I chose the crusty professor. I told him at the beginning of our consultation I wanted facts and stats, handed him a copy of my histopathology report, said I had already crunched the numbers through Adjuvant Online for my overall survival, disease free survival and recurrence rates which I wanted him to double check as I thought they were too good to be true so maybe I made an error - he redid them and came up with the same results as I had - and he told me precisely what his recommendations were for me, which I accepted and followed. That section of our meeting lasted less than 10 minutes so we were able to chat about his daughters career for the last 10 minutes of the appointment. I consider the former the most valuable and productive 10 minutes of my BC treatment.

      about 8 years Flag
  • Daphne Beitman Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2009
    As far as any concerns you may have concerning treatment options that your oncologist will recommend, before you decide on anything please request an Oncotype DX test. Most insurance companies now cover this, and depending on your score you could be spared some of the more aggressive treatments. For example, my oncologist recommended chemotherapy, however my Oncotype DX score was an 11, very low on a scale to 100, which indicated my risk for it coming back was relatively low, and that chemo was more of risk than a benefit.
    about 8 years Comment Flag
  • Cathy Wadkins Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    Dear christy, Get him to write everything down that he expects you to take I'n order, because it will be overwhelming to try to asorb it all. I was told everything he wanted me to do and mentally I felt like I needed to do exactally what it said because I would lessen my Health
    about 8 years Comment Flag

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