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Linnea's Story

About her story

"I decided that chemo was going to be my friend and that it was going to save me."

In April of 2001, Linnea was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer. Her treatment regimen included chemotherapy and radiation, but she soon discovered that her best medicine was a motherly instinct to survive.

In this poignant video, Linnea talks about how her 10 year old daughter gave her the strength and motivation to move beyond the shock of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Bethany Greer Profile

    My mother has to do both radiation and chemotherapy for 6 weeks, what can I expect?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Chelita M Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Simptoms are different for everyone. During chemo my dr. Recommended to drink ginger ale, it helped me a lot with the nausea and was pretty much the only liquid I could take. Vitamin e helps a lot too, either orally or as an ointment specially during radiation. Take care.

      2 comments
    • Teresa Sewell Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Each person's journey is different. Your mother's oncologist will give you a list of medications and side aftects. These days, each type of cancer has it's own recipe card and the Dr follows that type of treatment. Depending on the reactions to the treatment, this can be altered. I was...

      more

      Each person's journey is different. Your mother's oncologist will give you a list of medications and side aftects. These days, each type of cancer has it's own recipe card and the Dr follows that type of treatment. Depending on the reactions to the treatment, this can be altered. I was allergic to one of my anti-nausea medications and I got migranes. My Dr changed medicines. Expect nothing after the first dose of chemo. The symptons usually begin after the second treatment. Radiation will follow. The radiation oncologist will set up a treatment regimine specifically designed for your mother. She may get sore and red in the treated area. The staff at the radiation clinic will give her lotion that is best suited for her reaction. Although this is a scary walk for your mother and your family, there is always support within the oncology and radiation clinics. If you or your mother has issues coping, make sure you let her doctors know. Some find support groups are available, but I chose not to attend. A cookbook, Eating Well Thru Cancer, was useful to me as it helped with food selections while I was having some symptoms. Bottom line is, if you have questions or concerns at all thru this process, the doctors and their staff are trained and more than willing to help you thru this phase of your mother's life. Take care and good luck.

      Comment
  • Cindy Jones Profile

    I had stage 2 breast cancer two years ago and had a lumpectomy and 27 radiation treatments followed by five years of arimidex. Just received news of another suspicious lump. I'm so scared to go through this again. Please pray with me 😢

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    7 months 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hey Cindy I went thru the same experience. Stage 0 cancer, lumpectomy, 35 radiation treatments and Tamoxifen for 5 years. 2 yrs later another suspicious area biopsy done which tested positive. I ended up having a double mastectomy w/immediate reconstruction. Doing it all over I would have had the...

      more

      Hey Cindy I went thru the same experience. Stage 0 cancer, lumpectomy, 35 radiation treatments and Tamoxifen for 5 years. 2 yrs later another suspicious area biopsy done which tested positive. I ended up having a double mastectomy w/immediate reconstruction. Doing it all over I would have had the mastectomy from the beginning. I was just in shock like we all are when diagnosed & couldn't get passed loosing my breast. Stay positive suspicious doesn't mean cancer.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Such scary news. I'm sorry. Try to stay positive. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Aleeza Chaudhry Profile

    My mother started Taxol this past Monday. A/C was VERY hard on her but we were hopeful that Taxol was going to be easier. However, her body aches are beyond painful and painkillers dont work. Isn't Taxol supposed to be easier than A/C?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Not always I'm with your mom. Taxol was worse for me and by five or so days into it and off the pre meds it was determined I was allergic to it they shifted me into taxotare and extended mths pre medication. Bes to her and the team decision.

      1 comment
    • michelle j Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      The first couple of cycles of Taxol were very painful for me, also. My oncologist said it was because of the combination of the Taxol and the remaining A/C in my system. A couple of weeks in, all of the pain went away and I felt much better.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Peeling,itching on both nipples and peeling on the middle of the breasts.is it cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 4 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Any changes to one's body needs to be checked by your doctor. Some testing may be in order to determine what's causing it. Make an appointment, OK?

      Comment
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Betti is right. There is no telling what the cause is without seeing a doctor, or what treatment might be needed.

      Comment

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