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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Karen Milburn Profile

    Have something good to share. Need some help creating a thank you email. I was invited by a co-worker to lunch. We reached the lobby 50 of my co-workers all had black shirts with "Fight like a Girl, Team Karen", in pink. see comments.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Karen Milburn Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      After crying &hugging we all got a pic taken together & another with us holding up our fists. I want to thank them but have been struggling with the words. Any help or suggestions?

      Comment
    • Becky Lynn Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Just tell them how you felt when you saw them. What a wonderful gesture of support!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I've had moderately severe psoriasis on my hands since the age of 6. I am concerned abut how it will respond to chemo and radiation. Anyone had experience with this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • kim sosa Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had severe psoriasis on my elbows and the chemo killed all of it. I finished chemo two months ago and so far it has not come back.

      Comment
  • Samantha Afrey Profile

    Hello, Is it normal for the surgeon to not remove any more lymph nodes if the sentinel node shows a tumour mass of 2mm? I thought that a larger mass in the modes would warrant further biopsies in the other nodes. Thanks so much! Sandra

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 3 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I'm with Sharon, please ask your doctor for answers.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Samantha,
      My surgeon removed 5 sentinel nodes and at the time of my mastectomy surgery, she said they looked cancer free. It wasn't until the final pathology was done there was micromets found in one. The surgeon said there was an 8% chance I had cancer in my other lymph nodes but she made...

      more

      Samantha,
      My surgeon removed 5 sentinel nodes and at the time of my mastectomy surgery, she said they looked cancer free. It wasn't until the final pathology was done there was micromets found in one. The surgeon said there was an 8% chance I had cancer in my other lymph nodes but she made the decision not to remove any more because of the chance of causing lymphedema which is a lifelong battle.
      I think your question needs to be posed to your surgeon because any of us would be guessing as to why that decision was made. I am now 8 years out from treatment and cancer free. I did go through 4 rounds of AC and 5 years of Letrozole. There are all sorts of reasons why your surgeon did not remove the rest of your nodes. You may have had a low grade cancer that wasn't fast growing too. When in doubt, ALWAYS ask you surgeon or oncologist. They know your case and can give you correct answers. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
  • Christa M Profile

    Waiting for biopsy results is driving me crazy. Had my biopsy one Thursday so I should know by the end of the week,

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      MEEEE TOOOOO! It is so terrifying and sickening to have to wait. Try to keep in mind doctors are doing lots of biopsy's because they strive to be pro-active. One of the gripes of the insurance company's is too many are done. So many of these biopsy's come back benign. We, as humans, always...

      more

      MEEEE TOOOOO! It is so terrifying and sickening to have to wait. Try to keep in mind doctors are doing lots of biopsy's because they strive to be pro-active. One of the gripes of the insurance company's is too many are done. So many of these biopsy's come back benign. We, as humans, always go to the dark side. Arrrrgh. Please keep us posted, I hope it all comes back benign. I will share with you my radiologist told me, straight up, at the biopsy, "It would come back positive." She was right but today, I am cancer free!!!

      I hope and pray the time goes by quickly and you will be ok. Hang in there, we all know what you are going through.

      Sharon

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The waiting and unknown can be horrible. Try to surround yourself with people and things to do to keep your mind off it! I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you. Hearing that my tumor was a small cancer at age 31 made me feel like I was hit by a truck. But I too, am cancer free and about to...

      more

      The waiting and unknown can be horrible. Try to surround yourself with people and things to do to keep your mind off it! I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you. Hearing that my tumor was a small cancer at age 31 made me feel like I was hit by a truck. But I too, am cancer free and about to turn 33.

      Comment
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