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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Jen F Profile

    CT scan results tomorrow and hubby can't make it (can join by phone if needed). Getting lots of positive support but everyone seems horrified at the thought of my going to appointments alone - do you prefer alone or with support?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I prefer my husband with me but sometimes he can't and that's ok too. The onc appointment I found put I had to do chemo I was alone. It was not good but I made it.

      Comment
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      An extra set if ears is good . Writing down a list of questions helps me keep focused. Sometimes the news sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher. Blah, Blah, blah. Often seems surreal. Sending positive thoughts and good results your way!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have a lump in my breast around the nipple area. How do I know if something is wrong?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Blanca Polo Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Call your doctor! You are important. Do it ASAP!

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You need to call your doctor as soon as possible and have it checked out. It may be nothing but only diagnostic tests can tell for sure. Good luck and God bless you.

      Comment
  • Lynn Rambo Profile

    I'm planning to shave my head before I lose my hair an Adriamycin and Cytoxan. When is the best time to do this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      I would say whenever the hair falling out starts driving you crazy or makes you sad or mad. I cut mine really short in advance. Then I had my hairdresser on standby, and had her shave my head the morning of my second chemo, it was 2 weeks after my first A/C.

      1 comment
    • Jill M. Profile
      anonymous
      stage_2a Patient

      I cut mine short before I started and then shaved it completely after my 2nd treatment. I was on an every other week schedule - so it was about 3 weeks in when I shaved it. Have someone with you when you do it (and a glass of wine) and try to make it fun!!

      1 comment
  • Tawonna Anthony Profile

    What if you get pregnant while undergoing chemotherapy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    almost 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Jessica Fisher Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      It's very harmful to a fetus I was told that abortion would be the best option do I am havin my tubes tied

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Tawonna. This is what I found on the American Cancer Society:
      "Chemo usually is not given during the first 3 months of pregnancy (the first trimester). This is because most of the fetus’s internal organs develop during this time. The risk of miscarriage (losing the baby) is also the greatest...

      more

      Hi Tawonna. This is what I found on the American Cancer Society:
      "Chemo usually is not given during the first 3 months of pregnancy (the first trimester). This is because most of the fetus’s internal organs develop during this time. The risk of miscarriage (losing the baby) is also the greatest during the first trimester. The safety of chemo during this time has not been studied because of concerns about damage to the fetus.

      It was once thought that all chemo drugs would harm the fetus. But studies have shown that certain chemo drugs used during the second and third trimesters (the fourth through ninth months of pregnancy) do not raise the risk of birth defects, stillbirths, or health problems shortly after birth. But researchers still do not know whether these children will have any long-term effects.

      When a pregnant woman with early breast cancer needs adjuvant chemo after surgery, it’s usually delayed until at least the second trimester. If a woman is already in her third trimester when the cancer is found, the chemo may be delayed until after birth. The birth may be induced (brought on) a few weeks early in these cases. Depending on the extent of the cancer, these same treatment plans may also be used for women whose disease is more advanced.

      Chemo should not be given 3 to 4 weeks before delivery. This is because one side effect of chemo is that it lowers the mother’s blood counts. This could cause bleeding and increase the chances of infection during birth. Holding off on chemo for the last few weeks before delivery allows the mother’s blood counts to return to normal levels before childbirth."

      I have read about several women who have delivered healthy babies after having chemo. Best wishes to you. :)

      Comment
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