loading... close

Jan's Story

About her story

"I am one woman among hundreds of thousands of women who are learning to be courageous, and to overcome, and to live in the face of cancer."

Jan was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer in June 2009 after undergoing a routine bone scan for an unrelated injury. A wife and mother, Jan described her initial diagnosis as a complete shock.

"I remember just the sensation of having the wind sucked out of my lungs, a sucker punch, or something that stops you mid-stride," says Jan about her diagnosis. "And then as you begin to breathe again, there's this one million questions that circle your mind. "

Realizing that her family needed her and that she had some things she still wanted to accomplish, Jan decided to fight. Her touching story of survival and hope is an inspiration to anyone facing the difficult journey of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    If 3 of 14 lymph nodes were affected by cancer, is there any chance that cancer could've spread to any other parts of my body? Or, should I assume that "if not all of the lymph nodes were involved, then it definitely could not have spread?"

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 4 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Mary G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Anon ~ I had 2 lymph nodes involved that were "treatment evident" after chemo, was told no measurable cancer and nodes still encapsulated. Both good signs according to my onc. However, my understanding is that node involvement or not there is always a chance of recurrence. Sometimes it's about...

      more

      Anon ~ I had 2 lymph nodes involved that were "treatment evident" after chemo, was told no measurable cancer and nodes still encapsulated. Both good signs according to my onc. However, my understanding is that node involvement or not there is always a chance of recurrence. Sometimes it's about DNA, stage, grade, type of BC, etc...there are no guarantees. We all hope for the best and live life with joy regardless. My Doc explained that she will take care of the science and I should control what I can; diet and exercise, attitude, outlook and that's what I do. Yes, sometimes it's hard but push past the negative and don't let cancer steal from you. Best to you!

      Comment
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree with Mary. But I also had a ct scan and brain scan after surgery with six of ten involved. Hugs. Forward.

      Comment
  • nicky doyle Profile

    Hi all, I'm 27 yrs old from Ireland im scheduled for a mastectomy, then chemo and radiation would love to have contact with someone around my age whos gone or going through treatment

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Brooke Lancaster Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Hi Nicky, I am 33, was diagnosed at 32. I just finished my 6 rounds of chemo 3 weeks ago and starting radiation next week. I was diagnosed 2 A. Triple negative. I did pretty good thru chemo. No nausea, just very tired, and it went really fast. Can't believe I am done. Hang in there and u will get...

      more

      Hi Nicky, I am 33, was diagnosed at 32. I just finished my 6 rounds of chemo 3 weeks ago and starting radiation next week. I was diagnosed 2 A. Triple negative. I did pretty good thru chemo. No nausea, just very tired, and it went really fast. Can't believe I am done. Hang in there and u will get thru it. Stay strong and positive. Remember it's all mind over matter.

      Comment
    • Lucy Whiten Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi. I'm 32 and was diagnosed sept 2011 while my husband was in Afghanistan. I've had my first lot of chemo followed by another 5 cycles I'm then having a masectomy and reconstruction then radiotherapy. I can't believe how many strong women there are out there going through the same thing. It...

      more

      Hi. I'm 32 and was diagnosed sept 2011 while my husband was in Afghanistan. I've had my first lot of chemo followed by another 5 cycles I'm then having a masectomy and reconstruction then radiotherapy. I can't believe how many strong women there are out there going through the same thing. It really touches my heart. Stay strong like me :-) x

      Comment
  • Alglen Thelex Garay Profile

    is it ok to refuse chemo or herceptin after surgery and ask for oral medication instead...

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Alglen,
      If you are asking is it ok to refuse the advise to have chemotherapy.... it is a personal decision. A patient can do whatever they choose. If you as saying a patient does not want to take the advise of their caregivers about chemo and --thinks-- taking an oral medication will be as...

      more

      Alglen,
      If you are asking is it ok to refuse the advise to have chemotherapy.... it is a personal decision. A patient can do whatever they choose. If you as saying a patient does not want to take the advise of their caregivers about chemo and --thinks-- taking an oral medication will be as effective as chemotherapy, they are dead wrong. Breast cancer is a very tough opponent and it has to be dealth with while your mom has the chance. This is her golden opportunity to throw everything there is at her cancer. There is no easy way out if she fights this. Chemo isn't fun but the side effects can be managed. My best friend chose not to have chemotherapy and she is dead. Surgery can only remove the primary tumor and lymph nodes. It is the cancer cells that may be circulating around her body the chemotherapy targets. Your mom shouldn't let breast cancer win by her being scared to DEATH by the treatment. I am extremely harsh sounding because I detest having breast cancer win and take one of my sisters. There isn't an easy way around a battle with breast cancer. Tell you mom, she has to fight like a real warrior. She really has more strength within her than she thinks. God's blessings, take care, Sharon

      5 comments
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I'm on herceptin and as far as I know there is no oral medication counterpart. Tamoxifen is given to women who have ER tumors. herceptin is given to women who have HER2 tumors. Chemo is your best bet against an aggressive form of breast cancer such as HER2 .

      Comment
  • Karen Schroeder Profile

    I was diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer on 9/7. Having a double mastectomy with reconstruction surgery is not scheduled until 10/18. It is not in the lymph nodes now - is 8 weeks a long wait for surgery? Afraid it will spread during the wait.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • L D  Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2004

      It depends on what stage. If it is DCIS (stage 0), then you are probably fine. Did you discuss your concerns with your doctor? I had early stage cancer and waited about 3 weeks before surgery. I had the bilateral mas. and reconstruction done at the same time as well.

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Karen, you should be ok. Have you discussed your concerns with your breast surgeon? Are you going to be receiving chemo or radiation afterwards?

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word