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Jan's Story

About her story

"I am one woman among hundreds of thousands of women who are learning to be courageous, and to overcome, and to live in the face of cancer."

Jan was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer in June 2009 after undergoing a routine bone scan for an unrelated injury. A wife and mother, Jan described her initial diagnosis as a complete shock.

"I remember just the sensation of having the wind sucked out of my lungs, a sucker punch, or something that stops you mid-stride," says Jan about her diagnosis. "And then as you begin to breathe again, there's this one million questions that circle your mind. "

Realizing that her family needed her and that she had some things she still wanted to accomplish, Jan decided to fight. Her touching story of survival and hope is an inspiration to anyone facing the difficult journey of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    do both breast hurt if u have breast cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      There are a lot of reasons your breasts can hurt. Get it checked by the doctor.

      Comment
  • Alice McInnis Profile

    What is the 5 year survival rate for inmflamatory breast cancer/ stage 4 no brain mets; no initial treatment

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Alice. I try not to pay attention to the 5 year survival stats. Everything online is based on studies performed at least 5 years ago. And treatment has improved in the last few years. Have you been diagnosed recently?

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree with Diana. All you need to think about is your survival rate. Do everything the doctors tell you and take excellent care of yourself. Believe that your survival rate is 100% because it can be. Remember that God loves you and will help you if you ask.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default
  • Thumb avatar default

    I was just diagnosed with stage lll and I'm in process of completing all my labs and test . I was told about a cap you can wear after treatment to keep from losing hair. Has any one used this ? If so how was it? Side effects?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I also had my hairdresser friend shave my long hair when it started falling out. I got a synthetic wig and it looked just like my hair. It was light and didn't really bother me.I just wasn't one of those women that could walk around bald, although I give them credit. I hadnt heard much bout the...

      more

      I also had my hairdresser friend shave my long hair when it started falling out. I got a synthetic wig and it looked just like my hair. It was light and didn't really bother me.I just wasn't one of those women that could walk around bald, although I give them credit. I hadnt heard much bout the cold cap. I just think, no matter what you do, certain chemos make you lose hair, just a part of the process.Now almost two years after dx my hair has grown back, still short, but I love it n it is way healthier. You will get through this. Have faith

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Earlier, we had a bit of a discussion about the cold cap. You must ask your oncologist about it as there is some talk about it interferring with the chemotherapy. SInce chemo. attacks fast growing cells, which hair is, the cold cap keep the chemotherapy from reaching the scalp. Your cancer...

      more

      Earlier, we had a bit of a discussion about the cold cap. You must ask your oncologist about it as there is some talk about it interferring with the chemotherapy. SInce chemo. attacks fast growing cells, which hair is, the cold cap keep the chemotherapy from reaching the scalp. Your cancer could hide out in that tissue. Hopefully, some others will come forth with more information about the pluses and minuses of the cold cap. Last work always comes from your oncologist. Remember.... Bald, is beautiful! Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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