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Jan's Story

About her story

"I am one woman among hundreds of thousands of women who are learning to be courageous, and to overcome, and to live in the face of cancer."

Jan was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer in June 2009 after undergoing a routine bone scan for an unrelated injury. A wife and mother, Jan described her initial diagnosis as a complete shock.

"I remember just the sensation of having the wind sucked out of my lungs, a sucker punch, or something that stops you mid-stride," says Jan about her diagnosis. "And then as you begin to breathe again, there's this one million questions that circle your mind. "

Realizing that her family needed her and that she had some things she still wanted to accomplish, Jan decided to fight. Her touching story of survival and hope is an inspiration to anyone facing the difficult journey of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Cheryl Bartels Profile

    Anybody have a PICC line instead of a port, are you comfortable with it?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have a port and I'm so thankful for it! I'm done with chemo. Now I only get if flushed once a month and if I need labs they just do it right then and there just 1 poke. The area around port got sore after every treatment but not bad at all. I sometimes forget I have it.

      Comment
    • Linda Burke Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Are you asking because you have one? PICC lines need weekly sterile dressing changes and are more exposed than a port , Typically being in the upper arm area with the lumens hanging down the arm. They also need to be flushed more frequently than the ports when not in use. No pain with accessing...

      more

      Are you asking because you have one? PICC lines need weekly sterile dressing changes and are more exposed than a port , Typically being in the upper arm area with the lumens hanging down the arm. They also need to be flushed more frequently than the ports when not in use. No pain with accessing the PICC line though :)

      2 comments
  • Summer Lynch Profile

    Is anyone having eczema type spots on the face due to chemo? And any tips on getting rid of them? (I am 39 and have oily skin...so dry is new to me.)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      My skin has always been oily but chemo made it dry. My skin began to peel around my ears. My dr suggested Eucerin cream or lotion and it really helped. I finished chemo in Sept. and my skin is getting oily again.

      Comment
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I didn't have that but my skin got really dry. I just had a facial today- it was wonderful. Maybe that would help? It wouldn't hurt :)

      Comment
  • gima green Profile

    My medical report said Lymphovascular invasion, should I be concern now that the lumpectomy surgery is over?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      From my understanding it doesn't mean it's in the lymph nodes just the vessels around the tumor. I'm thinking I also had that in my pathology report but my Surgeon removed 8 nodes during the mastectomy and all 8 were negative. Talk with your doctor regarding the report and let them know there...

      more

      From my understanding it doesn't mean it's in the lymph nodes just the vessels around the tumor. I'm thinking I also had that in my pathology report but my Surgeon removed 8 nodes during the mastectomy and all 8 were negative. Talk with your doctor regarding the report and let them know there is something you don't understand and ask them to explain it to you.

      1 comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      It means cells were detected in your lymph nodes. Which means your cancer is 'invasive'. It spread outside of the original tumor. I know that sounds scary, but it's not as bad as it sounds. Your team of dr's will come up with a plan of treatment suited for your situation. Keep in mind that I am...

      more

      It means cells were detected in your lymph nodes. Which means your cancer is 'invasive'. It spread outside of the original tumor. I know that sounds scary, but it's not as bad as it sounds. Your team of dr's will come up with a plan of treatment suited for your situation. Keep in mind that I am not a dr. You need to have your dr explanation your pathology report and treatment options. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    When do I schedule the oncologist?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Your surgeon should give you a referral to oncologist other wise see you gp

      Comment

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