loading... close

Jan's Story

About her story

"I am one woman among hundreds of thousands of women who are learning to be courageous, and to overcome, and to live in the face of cancer."

Jan was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer in June 2009 after undergoing a routine bone scan for an unrelated injury. A wife and mother, Jan described her initial diagnosis as a complete shock.

"I remember just the sensation of having the wind sucked out of my lungs, a sucker punch, or something that stops you mid-stride," says Jan about her diagnosis. "And then as you begin to breathe again, there's this one million questions that circle your mind. "

Realizing that her family needed her and that she had some things she still wanted to accomplish, Jan decided to fight. Her touching story of survival and hope is an inspiration to anyone facing the difficult journey of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Madison Ware Profile

    Do you get scared if you're diagnosed with breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Absolutely. Receiving a breast cancer diagnosis is frightening, shocking and confusing ... it turns your world upside down. Suddenly you are facing your own mortality. But life is for living, so you need to shift your focus from the negative to doing whatever you can to be strong in body and...

      more

      Absolutely. Receiving a breast cancer diagnosis is frightening, shocking and confusing ... it turns your world upside down. Suddenly you are facing your own mortality. But life is for living, so you need to shift your focus from the negative to doing whatever you can to be strong in body and mind. In addition to what the medical profession advises, eat well, exercise, medicate, try complementary therapies - whatever it takes. Remember: God helps those who help themselves. A BC diagnosis is NOT a death sentence, women can and do recover and lead long, healthy lives.

      Comment
    • Buster OBuster Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      YES. After my doctor said the C word, I can't remember anything else that was said. That's why you should ALWAYS take an advocate with you at ALL appointments. My advocate was my St Mom.

      Comment
  • Susan Denevan Profile

    Has anyone had adverse reactions from receiving herceptin alone?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • Sue Rice Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I have dizziness, tiredness, runny nose that suddenly dries up and hurts, brittle nails I have also put on weight and the fatigue is frustrating you want to exercise but it is just so hard! But it has kept me stable for 3 years so far so its worth it.

      Comment
    • holly jones Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am actually going for a ct scan tomorrow due to some dizziness/headache on & off,hoping its nothing! I also have a runny nose for a couple weeks after the treatment and a cough/sore throat the night of treatment. I finished with chemo in November and hoping my last herceptin will be in June!

      Comment
  • leslie adkins Profile

    What are your thoughts of people who do the gene test, it comes back positive, and they go in for surgery, reconstruction, etc? Me? I'd rather get regular testing, and avoid the pain, etc.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • melissa perlman Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      As you can see, different feelings from everyone. Myself, came out brca 2 pos. opted for the double mastectomy with prophylactic hysterectomy. I obviously had breast cancer once, chances are way too high I'd see it again in my lifetime. Pain us relative and more easily treatable than cancer. I...

      more

      As you can see, different feelings from everyone. Myself, came out brca 2 pos. opted for the double mastectomy with prophylactic hysterectomy. I obviously had breast cancer once, chances are way too high I'd see it again in my lifetime. Pain us relative and more easily treatable than cancer. I just finished everything in December. Would do it again in a heartbeat.

      Comment
    • Stephanie S Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      I think that's the wonderful thing about having a choice, not everyone would choose the same route. I'm 25 and have a lot of years to live which also means a lot of years for reoccurrence to happen and would rather go through the surgery now to hopefully stop it from ever coming back. For me it...

      more

      I think that's the wonderful thing about having a choice, not everyone would choose the same route. I'm 25 and have a lot of years to live which also means a lot of years for reoccurrence to happen and would rather go through the surgery now to hopefully stop it from ever coming back. For me it was an easy choice I made before my testing even came back positive, I knew what route I would take even before seeing the reoccurrence chance %'s. Luckily everyone is different and at least here in Canada, has the choice with how they want to handle a positive test. I have some family members who want to be tested, and some that don't, and that's 100% their choice, but at least they are aware and can get regular screening.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone not taken Tamoxifen when advised to? Ive been told that it will have a less than 1% chance of stopping my cancer returning and am very dubious about taking it.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I decided not to take tamoxifen when I was first diagnosed in 2003 with DCIS I chose to have bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies was going above and beyond since my aunt had lumpectomy and 5 years of tamoxifen at the 10 year mark she had a reoccurrence. I wasn't going to take that route well in...

      more

      I decided not to take tamoxifen when I was first diagnosed in 2003 with DCIS I chose to have bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies was going above and beyond since my aunt had lumpectomy and 5 years of tamoxifen at the 10 year mark she had a reoccurrence. I wasn't going to take that route well in 2005 I had suspicious mammograms further mastectomies showed atypical hyperplasia. In 2008 almost at my 5 year mark again had suspicious mammograms went back in and the surgeon scrapped down to my rib cage and axillary area. Path report showed DCIS with micro invasive cells along the incision line. Not sure if I took tamoxifen in 2003 this would not of happened my aunt took tamoxifen and also had a reoccurrence it's just how the cards fall. In 2008 I decided to take the tamoxifen why risk it again. Was on it for 3 years am now menopausal so was switched to arimidex which I'll be on for another 5 years. At this point in my life I look at the options, do my research and see what is the standard of care, and just go with it. There are a lot of survivors out there and a lot of options bottom line is you have to do what is best for you. Take care

      6 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am on Femara.... which is also a hormone blocking drug. Since I have tolerated it except for the massive hot flashes, I have continued to take it. I figure, this is my best shot at ---possibly--- preventing a reoccurance. I am at the 5 year mark in January. If it truly is only 1%, for...

      more

      I am on Femara.... which is also a hormone blocking drug. Since I have tolerated it except for the massive hot flashes, I have continued to take it. I figure, this is my best shot at ---possibly--- preventing a reoccurance. I am at the 5 year mark in January. If it truly is only 1%, for Tamoxifen, that is pretty lousy odds for suffering through the side effects. If I were you, I would not take only one opinion about those odds, I would be doing a lot of investigation before I would refuse to take the drug that might help prevent a reoccurance. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 2

Inspire hope by becoming an advocate for breast cancer prevention.

spread the word