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Abby Brown's Story

About her story

A small part of the chemo journey - shaving the hair on your head and dealing with baldness. What cancer takes away - and family gives back. Unconditionally

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I had IDC,stage 2A,nodes was clear.Doctors said I need chemo but do not need radiotherapy.I did my second chemo,but I think may be I need radiotherapy too, I afraid.I spoke with 2 doctor both said I do not need radiotherapy ,but I afraid they made mistake

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Did you have a mastectomy? If you did, and you had no cancer in your nodes, there isn't any breast tissue to radiate. The chemotherapy (a systemic treatment) is taking care of any cancer cells that may have escaped the original tumor and circulating through your system.
      Six years ago, I had...

      more

      Did you have a mastectomy? If you did, and you had no cancer in your nodes, there isn't any breast tissue to radiate. The chemotherapy (a systemic treatment) is taking care of any cancer cells that may have escaped the original tumor and circulating through your system.
      Six years ago, I had IDC 2B. with micro cancer in one lymph node. My treatment was a mastectomy and 4 rounds of AC, no radiation with 5 years of hormone blocking drug. I was ER+ PR+ her2- So far, I am still here and cancer free. That is NOT to say we had the same kind of cancer cells, but that was my treatment.
      Take care, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I agree with Betti. Ask for a consultation with a radiologist. This is who is most qualified to give you an opinion about rads.

      Comment
  • teresa clark Profile

    I had my first round of chemo 7 days ago and today I have a rash on my hand and chest and my hair feels like its been in a pony tail too long--sore! Is this the beginning of the "fall out?"

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • vicki e Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Get some satin pillowcases. It will be gentle on your sore scalp. Hugs and prayers

      1 comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Teresa,

      Good description of your scalp! It does have that very feeling as it is about to start letting loose. It just gets tender and I could only wear one specific hat that was made of the softest baby yarn. I would check with the doctor about your rash. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Jo Thomas Profile

    I am struggling with constipation with each chemo cycle & have been taking coloxyl & movocol, but I'm getting very bloated, is that from the drugs or constipation? It's very painful!

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    over 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • cindy stephenson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I too took miralax and pushed fluids. I also added benefiber and a probiotic.

      Comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Like Blair, I ended up using Prilosec as well. Not for constipation but for acidic grossness deep in my stomach. My oncologist thought it was responsible for much of my nausea. So about 1/2 way through 8 treatments I started that as well and I felt so much better which in turn helped my eating...

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      Like Blair, I ended up using Prilosec as well. Not for constipation but for acidic grossness deep in my stomach. My oncologist thought it was responsible for much of my nausea. So about 1/2 way through 8 treatments I started that as well and I felt so much better which in turn helped my eating and drinking. So I guess it was all related after all for me. The prilosec is pricey but SO worth it!

      Comment
  • Kali Nguyen Profile

    Double Mastectomy after chemo, how rough was it and recovery until radiation? Do they take lymph node to?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had double with immediate reconstruction. Reconstruction was painful only for 2 weeks. I had implants inserted @ time of macectomy. 6 lymph nodes all negative. From what I've read straight mastectomy is fairly easy. 🙏🏾

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I only had a single mastectomy and my surgeon took sentinel nodes, not the ones in my armpits. I did have a microscopic bit of cancer in one. The single mastectomy was very easy for me. I never had to take any pain medication because they cut nerves so there was nothing there to signal pain. ...

      more

      I only had a single mastectomy and my surgeon took sentinel nodes, not the ones in my armpits. I did have a microscopic bit of cancer in one. The single mastectomy was very easy for me. I never had to take any pain medication because they cut nerves so there was nothing there to signal pain.
      As for how extensive your surgery will be depends on your particular case. Whether your surgeon has to take axial (armpit) nodes is again depending on your case. You need to discuss this with your surgeon because we can't tell you. Sometimes even your surgeon doesn't know until they get in there. An MRI will help tell how extensive it is. Being that it sounds like you had chemotherapy before your surgery, that is meant to shrink the tumor so it's not as large. It usually does a great job. Get an appointment with your surgeon. We usually say you don't really get a complete diagnosis until after the final pathology after your surgery. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      Comment

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