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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Should you tell your 10 year old daughter if you've been diagnosed with stage 0 (DCIS) breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Misty Wells Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes you should... my 10

      Comment
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes, let her be a part of your journey. It will build your relationship and she will grow up understanding why early detection is so important.

      Comment
  • Val Briggs Profile

    I am having mastectomy for DCIS Doctor wants to do sentinel node biopsy this worries me will I get lymphodema and why do I need it?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 4 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Mandana K. Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello,in any stage and any grade as a rule ,doctors must remove lymph nodes ,especially in early stages now in the world tumor surgeons remove sentinel nodes,it has more accuracy than traditional lymph nodes dissection.Well removing sentinel node is part of any breast cancer surgery ,they do it...

      more

      Hello,in any stage and any grade as a rule ,doctors must remove lymph nodes ,especially in early stages now in the world tumor surgeons remove sentinel nodes,it has more accuracy than traditional lymph nodes dissection.Well removing sentinel node is part of any breast cancer surgery ,they do it for knowing about your staging.You said u has DCIS ,well sometimes a patient has multiple of DCIS and after surgery they will find them, especially if u have grade 3 breast cancer it is more need to remove sentinel node.I myself had 22mm tumor in my left breast ,I did bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction at the same time they found my sentinel node with GaMMA SCAN and removed it ,then they gave it to pathologist,they said no your node were free.Lymphedema is a side effect of traditional dissection of lymph nodes,but now if doctor removes more than 10 nodes may be it occur too.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Not necessarily, with sentinel biopsy it is a risk. I had one and have not had lymphodema. The biopsy makes sure they the cancer has not spread to lymph nodes.....I was happy I had it. I have had soreness. I am a year and a half out.

      1 comment
  • Susan Denevan Profile

    Is anyone taking arimedix? And if so, what is your experience like?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Afternoon Susan I was just switched to arimedix after taking tamoxifen for the past 3 years i'm now menopausal so was switched. The cycle begins again severe hot flashes exhaustion bone and joint pain. My doctor says it'll take about a month to adjust again. Was told if your feeling the side...

      more

      Afternoon Susan I was just switched to arimedix after taking tamoxifen for the past 3 years i'm now menopausal so was switched. The cycle begins again severe hot flashes exhaustion bone and joint pain. My doctor says it'll take about a month to adjust again. Was told if your feeling the side effects then it's doing it's job

      Comment
    • Mary Foti Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Nancy, I have had the same experience as you. I have had bone and joint pain, along with hot flashes, since I started Arimidex in October 2011. I find exercise really does help - for me, I try to do at least 30 minutes of yoga or walking every day. If I don't do that, I notice more stiffness. I...

      more

      Nancy, I have had the same experience as you. I have had bone and joint pain, along with hot flashes, since I started Arimidex in October 2011. I find exercise really does help - for me, I try to do at least 30 minutes of yoga or walking every day. If I don't do that, I notice more stiffness. I really don't like this drug, but hopefully it's working so I will not complain!

      Comment
  • kim sosa Profile

    I received my cocktail of chemo I will be taking Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide & Paclitaxel. Has anyone been on any of these and what should I expect? I start next Wed. Excited to start my journey and kill this bc and be normal and healthy again.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • shen cruces Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      Hi Kim, I am currently on AC and will be following it up with taxol also. I have only had two treatments so far and they have been spaces two weeks apart so I get to have the neupogen shot too. So far I am tired the day of chemo but I drink lots of fluids, not just water, to flush my system. ...

      more

      Hi Kim, I am currently on AC and will be following it up with taxol also. I have only had two treatments so far and they have been spaces two weeks apart so I get to have the neupogen shot too. So far I am tired the day of chemo but I drink lots of fluids, not just water, to flush my system. The next day is okay, then I am tired for the next 3-4 days. I keep on the schedule for the nausea meds which work well for me. I was told not to get behind on taking them. I eat lots of protein, fruit, and really anything that sounds remotely appetizing. Everyone's body is different so you might have less or more side effects. Hopefully less. I do visualize the chemo drugs doing their job (I picture PacMan chasing down all the cancer cells). It helps to feel confident that these drugs are helping us get back to our lives. You may be nervous the first day. Just make sure you drink lots of water starting the day before chemo and stock your fridge with things you like to eat. I had some heartburn issues after chemo so I always have foods that are easily digestible ready for me to grab. Best of luck to you. You and the chemo are going to kick some cancer butt on Wednesday!

      Comment
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