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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Brandi Carey Profile

    how does this whole sugery work?? they were talking drains&ports and all kinds of stuff. i seriously need info!!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Brandi,
      When you have surgery, mine was a mastectomy, there are fluids that form around the surgery site which has to be removed or else it would build up under the tissue. It is not a big deal. During the surgery, they run some tubing under the skin and the liquid collect in a little plastic...

      more

      Brandi,
      When you have surgery, mine was a mastectomy, there are fluids that form around the surgery site which has to be removed or else it would build up under the tissue. It is not a big deal. During the surgery, they run some tubing under the skin and the liquid collect in a little plastic bottle. The fluid drained will become less and less to in about 7 to 10 days the drain is removed. The drainage is NOT a painful process and niether is the removal. The port they are talking about is a gadget that is placed in your chest that has access to one of your main arteries. It is a whiz-bang way of delivering your chemo therapy treatment so you don't have to keep getting poked in your arms. I like to think of it like filling up your gas tank in your car. You open a flap and plug in the gas line! If makes blood draws and chemotherapy treatments a breeze.
      This is a huge thing that hits you and it will consume your life for a few months. First comes diagnosis, then sometimes you have to have a bunch of tests... MRI, CT, PET Scan, Bone Scan, MUGA scan, and what seems like gallons of blood. I would try to take a pal along during these test sessions and especially during your introductions to the surgeon, and oncologist. THey throw a lot your way and you can't begin to process it. Try to tape your sessions or have a pal take notes. You are partially terror-stricken and can't hear half of it. We can help fill in some blanks but only in generality's. Once you get completely through the diagnostic and FINALLY get a treatment plan, your life will settle down. During the diagnostics it is like you are dodging IED's. You are scared, and are imagining the worst. If you don't understand something.... DON'T be afraid to ask questions! This is not the time to be shy.... YOU HAVE TO BE YOUR OWN BEST ADVOCATE! This does not mean you have to become a snarling tiger, but you need clarifications to many aspects of this. Please keep in touch with us. We have been there, done that. Approach this with your girl-warrior pants on... and a big dose of humor won't hurt either. Hang in there darlin' you will make it as we all have. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      The drains r for ur benefit. They need to put them so ur body can drain and not swell up. Mine stayed a little longer then usual, but most ppl have them for a couple of weeks. The smart port is for u to get chemo. Makes it easier on ur veins. God bless.

      Comment
  • Megan Smith Profile

    Has anyone had success with acupunture for minimizing chemo side effects?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Megan, I haven't personally but I've heard other women say that it really helped with their chemo side effects. I would have but not being covered by my insurance it was out of my budget. Hopefully one of the other ladies has experienced that treatment. :)

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I tried it but for me it didn't work, unfortunately

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How long does it take after chemo for hair to begin growing back while on Tamoxifin?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      My hair began growing back about one week before my last Tamoxifen treatment. It started out as white fuzz...almost like down. Then it began looking more like hair. I ended up having to have more chemo with two new drugs but fortunately I didn't lose what little hair I had started to grow back. ...

      more

      My hair began growing back about one week before my last Tamoxifen treatment. It started out as white fuzz...almost like down. Then it began looking more like hair. I ended up having to have more chemo with two new drugs but fortunately I didn't lose what little hair I had started to grow back. :). Now my hair is really thick and growing well. Hopefully you'll have fast growth as well!!! :)

      Comment
    • dorothy harder Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Just like Diane, mine tried to push through but eye brows and lashes did better when off of tamoxifen.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    54 Found breast lump. Saw MD drained cyst. Mammogram showed finding. Ultrasound showed 3 masses. BI RAD 3. Saw surgeon scheduled a breast biposy wired guided Aug 31st. Same breast nipple x2 DX plugged gland No family HX adopted. Worried please advise.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Dear A, You're already doing the right thing by finding out what's going on. Hang in there. Keep posting. JO :-D

      1 comment
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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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