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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Christina Archambault Profile

    26 year old her 1 positive stage 2b 3 nosds pos. I get my last chemo April 19th ! I have been really strong for the most part threw this chemo! I find I am getting scared for my future as the chemo is coming to an end .. Did u worrie bout your future ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    about 6 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I'll be finished May 8th with chemo and I too feel apprehensive. Chemo has really tired me out and the affects of it are becoming more but still there's the comforting thought that chemo is fighting the cancer. I keep thinking that I must take one day at a time. There are still more procedures to...

      more

      I'll be finished May 8th with chemo and I too feel apprehensive. Chemo has really tired me out and the affects of it are becoming more but still there's the comforting thought that chemo is fighting the cancer. I keep thinking that I must take one day at a time. There are still more procedures to go through to be cancer free.

      1 comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I have heard this many, many, times! People have a sense of loss when they are coming to the end of their chemotherapy. You feel protected and cared for during your treatment and all of a sudden, it is over. So for everyone who has this feeling, it is oh so common. You are like a fledgling...

      more

      I have heard this many, many, times! People have a sense of loss when they are coming to the end of their chemotherapy. You feel protected and cared for during your treatment and all of a sudden, it is over. So for everyone who has this feeling, it is oh so common. You are like a fledgling getting pushed out into the world to fly on your own. I on the other hand, counted the days until I was done and although I liked everybody, I was thrilled to get back to my life, my horses, and my HAIR! I think this feeling of a little bit of loss, and this safe caccoon, is something that will fade as you transition to another part of your treatment or back to your regular life. My congratulations for being done with your chemo..... YAHOOO!!! You will continue to be strong but you are saying good bye to this part of your treatment. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • linda scaman Profile

    I had screening mammograms, I was called back for more mammograms and ultrasound , was told I had one cyst and another nodule that is "probably" benign ...now I am going for another ultrasound. Does this sound normal?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would ask your doctor to biopsy the suspicious area if there has already been one ultrasound. What is another ultrasound going to show. A biopsy will let you know for sure. Good luck to you!

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Everyone's different, and every doctor might treat the same situation differently. But in my experience, this is pretty typical. They probably want to take another, closer look at the benign nodule again, and for anything unusual that they didn't see the first time. If they haven't already, they...

      more

      Everyone's different, and every doctor might treat the same situation differently. But in my experience, this is pretty typical. They probably want to take another, closer look at the benign nodule again, and for anything unusual that they didn't see the first time. If they haven't already, they probably also will drain your cyst. It's done with a needle after numbing you up. Painless procedure.
      Please keep us posted on how everything goes. Best of luck!

      Comment
  • Savannah Workman Profile

    How is breast cancer treated at each level?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Savannah,
      If only it were that easy! Treatment depends on what is found on the pathology and other testing done. You can't just give a list for the different stages because there are different types of breast cancer. In the diagnosis, there are different conditions of cells, size of tumor,...

      more

      Savannah,
      If only it were that easy! Treatment depends on what is found on the pathology and other testing done. You can't just give a list for the different stages because there are different types of breast cancer. In the diagnosis, there are different conditions of cells, size of tumor, lymph node involvement, and aggressiveness of those cells. It also takes into consideration age, pre or post menapausal. This is what cancer research is all about. Each woman's treatment is tailor-made just for her instead of the shotgun approach. Lots of sites to read about treatments. It's a subject in which you will never find the end. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Margaret Balsamo Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Go to the Learn section, chapter 6. It's a nice overview of treatments.

      Comment
  • Jayne Howarth Profile

    I am about to start TC chemo 4 doses 3 weekly. Really interested to hear of anyone who fasted 62-48 hours prior to chemo and 24 hours afterwards. The humans studies done show greatly lessened side effects. Anyone done this and can share please?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 5 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • cindy stephenson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Oops I would start eatting to keep something n my stomach. I drank 64 oz of water. Ate yogurt protein etc. for me- not eatting would have made me sick. I never got sick. I had emend, Aloxi and decadron.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      When people hear you have breast cancer the nutty articles start being sent your way. Starving your body is not going to make the side effects less, it will make you weak and dehydrated. It will make the process all that much more difficult. You need good nutrition and keep yourself hydrated...

      more

      When people hear you have breast cancer the nutty articles start being sent your way. Starving your body is not going to make the side effects less, it will make you weak and dehydrated. It will make the process all that much more difficult. You need good nutrition and keep yourself hydrated while these drugs are going through your body. Your immune system is going to be compromised, and not fueling your body could put your overall health in severe jeopardy. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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