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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    How is breast cancer linked to ovarian cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 9 years 1 answer
  • sally go Profile

    What is the prognosis of Invasive Ductal Cancer Stage 4?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Sally, I was diagnosed with stage 3C cancer last May. I've always tried not to look at survival statistics. When I was diagnosed I made it a point to learn everything I could about my type of cancer. That way I could make a more informed decision about my care. Knowledge is power. Have you...

      more

      Hi Sally, I was diagnosed with stage 3C cancer last May. I've always tried not to look at survival statistics. When I was diagnosed I made it a point to learn everything I could about my type of cancer. That way I could make a more informed decision about my care. Knowledge is power. Have you spoken to your doctor about your treatment options?

      Comment
    • Shelia Combs Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      2 years ago today I was diagnosed with stage 4 invasive ductal carcinoma. 7 surgeries later, 13 months of chemo, 4 weeks of radiation and 12 months of femara, I'm still going strong. I'm not ready to stop just yet. I start more chemo in the next few weeks. But the best medicine I believe is faith...

      more

      2 years ago today I was diagnosed with stage 4 invasive ductal carcinoma. 7 surgeries later, 13 months of chemo, 4 weeks of radiation and 12 months of femara, I'm still going strong. I'm not ready to stop just yet. I start more chemo in the next few weeks. But the best medicine I believe is faith in Jesus and laughter. You have to be able to make fun of yourself and laugh at the cancer. I lost a very good friend just before thanksgiving this year, she lived with stage 4 for 13 years. She is my inspiration.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    About 7 months ago i went to an urgent care because of what i thought might be IBC. It had the signs of like stage 3. She gave me antibiotics and it went away and she just told me it was a cyst and i still don't believe her. I still dont believe her & im

    Asked by anonymous

    over 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I wouldn't be waiting, I would get to your doctor, and not urgent care right away. I would demand a biopsy, now. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      You can not diagnose by reading on the Internet. You may have 'signs' of cancer (a lump), but you wouldn't have 'signs' of stages. Could you feel a lump? Is that why the Dr said it was a cyst? Cysts don't just go away with antibiotics. Nor does cancer. So if you say whatever the problem you had...

      more

      You can not diagnose by reading on the Internet. You may have 'signs' of cancer (a lump), but you wouldn't have 'signs' of stages. Could you feel a lump? Is that why the Dr said it was a cyst? Cysts don't just go away with antibiotics. Nor does cancer. So if you say whatever the problem you had 7 months ago is gone, you don't have anything to worry about. Once you have your insurance, it sure wouldn't hurt to get a full check up along with a mammogram. If there is suspicion, you would then have a biopsy. That is the only way you would know if something is cancer or not. Any time there are changes in your breast, have it checked out. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Carly Zehner Profile

    My mother is going to start her 3-month treatment of TCH next week. Has anyone been through this treatment? If so, what where your side effects during treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Rotem Adar Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Just confirming that by TCH you mean Taxotere, Carboplatin and Herceptin. I just finished my chemo regimen in January. Everyone is different but I had food aversions, weight gain from the steroids, my hair fell out (though not completely, I never actually went bald, but I did shave it GI Jane...

      more

      Just confirming that by TCH you mean Taxotere, Carboplatin and Herceptin. I just finished my chemo regimen in January. Everyone is different but I had food aversions, weight gain from the steroids, my hair fell out (though not completely, I never actually went bald, but I did shave it GI Jane style), and the worst side effect was from the Neulasta shot (white blood cell booster) shot I had to take the day after chemo. It causes flu like symptoms. Oh, a few other symptoms from the chemo was a lot of exhaustion and fatigue, and I'm not sure if this tied in to the fatigue but it hurt me too much to wear high heels. I'm sure it had to do with my body being so tired. Hope this helps!

      2 comments

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An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

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