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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • sonali Singh Profile

    What thinks r good t eat during chimo

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 3 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I ate bland foods and small portions at a time. Because of the metal taste caused by chemo, I used plastic utensils and it helped. Keep the questions coming. We are here for you!

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Whatever tastes good as for everyone that's different and may be different from what you usually eat.

      Comment
  • Tom Schink Profile

    My mom just got diagnosed with breast cancer (early Stage 2) and is extremely worried that she will lose her job. First, what's the likelihood of that and second, how can I try to calm this fear?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has...

      more

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has to take off work for treatment. She should also inquire about any disability benefits her employer might offer. Best wishes to you and your Mom

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably ...

      more

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably deeper fears under this one about work. Not that you need to pry them outta her, but remind her she needs to take care of herself, that you're there to listen, and that you'll take her to anyone else she wants to talk to, including a support group.
      Best wishes.

      Comment
  • Penny Walton Profile

    Anyone experience issues with major short-term memory loss and total lack of ability to focus after initial diagnosis? Is it stress?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2014
    about 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Yes, yes, and oh yeah!!!! This is a stressfull situation then you add meds and chemo that make the whole thing worse. Write yourself notes, take a listener to all appointments, cut yourself a lot of slack. I found meditation and later yoga helped with a lot. I think it gets better with time or I...

      more

      Yes, yes, and oh yeah!!!! This is a stressfull situation then you add meds and chemo that make the whole thing worse. Write yourself notes, take a listener to all appointments, cut yourself a lot of slack. I found meditation and later yoga helped with a lot. I think it gets better with time or I got used to the new me. My worst day was the day I forgot to feed and water my horse and chickens. That is a chore I've been doing since I got married 37 years ago. My students didn't mind when I forgot to give a test. It is OK to feel this level of stress now in awhile it will turn into strength and you will figure out what you are fighting for. We are all warriors. God Bless your journey

      1 comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Yes Penny probably all of us. It's the stress that starts it, then it becomes 'chemo brain'. Sometimes I can't think of the simplest of things - like what an object is called - oh yeah, those are keys. Or the words to finish a sentence. My husband fills in the blanks as much as he can figure out....

      more

      Yes Penny probably all of us. It's the stress that starts it, then it becomes 'chemo brain'. Sometimes I can't think of the simplest of things - like what an object is called - oh yeah, those are keys. Or the words to finish a sentence. My husband fills in the blanks as much as he can figure out. Prayers to you.

      2 comments
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An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

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