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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • kim sosa Profile

    I was diagnosed stage 2 possible stage 3A because of lymp node involvement. My doctor said I should live a full life but reading things on the internet tell me otherwise. Any reassurance will help.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Oh Darlin!
      DO NOT READ THOSE HORROR STORIES! There are many, many, more successful outcomes than awful ones. Your eyes are going to be drawn to the horrible and it won't do you a bit of good except to depress you. "Been there.... done that." I would trust what your doctor says and put on...

      more

      Oh Darlin!
      DO NOT READ THOSE HORROR STORIES! There are many, many, more successful outcomes than awful ones. Your eyes are going to be drawn to the horrible and it won't do you a bit of good except to depress you. "Been there.... done that." I would trust what your doctor says and put on your big girl pink warrior panties and slap breast cancer in it's sassy face! You are always going to find the most horrendous stories and the most depressing statistics. You are not a statistic, you are a woman who was found to have breast cancer! Big deal.... HA! I also had breast cancer with node involvment, I am in my 5th year and just saw my oncologist last Wednesday. We "high-fived" each other in celebration of another clean check-up. He told me I was doing great and told me not to worry. PLEASE....Kim, your glass is really --half-full-- and heading for all the way full. You will get through your treatment and be ok. You have a bunch of women out there who are alive today because we have received great treatment and have the support of other women who have been treated before us. HANG IN THERE, GIRL! Healing hugs and courage. Do NOT listen to negative stories... there are many more positive ones out there. God's blessings, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Kim, the ladies are right. Don't back attention to the stats online. For one thing....they're not up to date. And another...every woman is different. Only God knows when our time is up. No one else. I was stage 3C when I began my treatment last May. When they went in to do my bilateral mastectomy...

      more

      Kim, the ladies are right. Don't back attention to the stats online. For one thing....they're not up to date. And another...every woman is different. Only God knows when our time is up. No one else. I was stage 3C when I began my treatment last May. When they went in to do my bilateral mastectomy I had 13 positive lymph nodes. In three of the lymph nodes...the cancer had broken outside the node. It had also spread to my chest wall. After almost a year of treatment...I'm cancer free!!! Take a look at my bio if you'd like. Replace that internet search for survival stats with "uplifting survivor stories"!!!! You can do this Kim!! Lots of hugs, Diana

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I finally accepted my docs advise and I am on Lexapro *antidepressant* - the world seems brighter, but now I don't seem to care if the cancer comes back or not, I feel chemically altered, but I don' t care. Is this normal? radiation girl :)

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      We have to think about the cancer but you can't let it consume you. It is ok to take help because breast cancer is a life altering event. We have to live through it to get to our best selves.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I am on Effexor and feel the same way. It's better than crying all the time. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Nancy Wing Profile

    I was diagnosed with stage 0 DCIS. I had a single left mastectomy on 11/8/11. I am so scared it is going to happen on the other side. I started on tomaxifin to help reduce my risk. Does anyone know what the chances are it can happen on the other side?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Donna Gray Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision....

      more

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision. Best of luck to you.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is...

      more

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is no perfect treatment or "cure" for breast cancer even with mastectomies it us impossible to get all the breast tissue out unless they go back to the radical mastectomies of the old days. Main thing is to be your own advocate make sure you continue to have mammograms or breast ultrasounds. Early detection saves lifes. We all have in the back of our minds the "what if it comes back" thought. Even those that are 20 and 30 year survivors. Remember you are a survivor, and always try to stay positive. Don't let the negative thoughts interfere in a productive happy life. I always say no matter what there is something to be thankful for every day take care

      Comment
  • shirley john Profile

    hi I had a double mastectomy in jan this year can the cancer come back

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Yes, it can, but it doesn't mean it will. We can't live in fear of that happening, we just need to be vigil lent in self checks and follow ups with doctors. :)

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hi Shirley,
      I think we all live with the fear cancer can raise its ugly head as a metastisis somewhere else in the body. We all hope and pray we don't have it in our future. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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