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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 2 - Stage 0 & 1

Stage 0
Stage 0, DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma in Situ) is a noninvasive cancer where abnormal cells have been found in the lining of the breast milk duct.

Even though Stage 0 cancer is still noninvasive, it does require immediate treatment and is typically treated with surgery or radiation, or a combination of the two. Chemotherapy is not part of the treatment regimen for earlier stages of cancer.

Stage 1
In Stage 1 invasive breast cancer, the tumor has not exceeded 2cm (0.8in). Although it’s considered to be invasive, it has not yet spread to any surrounding lymph nodes or outside the breast tissue.

Related Questions

  • VERNA RIVERS Profile

    How many lymph nodes are in and around the breast?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 2 answers
    • melissa perlman Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      There are thousands. They are connected via vessels and form their own circulatory system. Help to transport fluid. Not blood. If damaged or too many nodes surgically removed, will cause lymphedema. A chronic swelling of an area. Treatment includes compression sleeves and/or massage to mobilize...

      more

      There are thousands. They are connected via vessels and form their own circulatory system. Help to transport fluid. Not blood. If damaged or too many nodes surgically removed, will cause lymphedema. A chronic swelling of an area. Treatment includes compression sleeves and/or massage to mobilize fluid.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Verna.... in the body, Lymph Nodes are a system in themselves. There are LOTS of lymph nodes, head, neck, arm pits, abdomen, groin....etc . When I had breast cancer, the surgeon took out my sentinel lymph nodes... usually under 5. These are thought to be the first lymph nodes where cancer...

      more

      Verna.... in the body, Lymph Nodes are a system in themselves. There are LOTS of lymph nodes, head, neck, arm pits, abdomen, groin....etc . When I had breast cancer, the surgeon took out my sentinel lymph nodes... usually under 5. These are thought to be the first lymph nodes where cancer will start to spread. Instead of doing a more radical "remove all auxillary lymph nodes" they just start with these few sentinel nodes if it is early stage breast cancer. By doing that, they can save the patient from possibly developing lymphadema.... a permanent swelling of the arm. Hopefully, someone else can add more information. It is easy to find more on lymph nodes by just "googling" LYMPH NODES. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Nancy Wing Profile

    I was diagnosed with stage 0 DCIS. I had a single left mastectomy on 11/8/11. I am so scared it is going to happen on the other side. I started on tomaxifin to help reduce my risk. Does anyone know what the chances are it can happen on the other side?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Donna Gray Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision....

      more

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision. Best of luck to you.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is...

      more

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is no perfect treatment or "cure" for breast cancer even with mastectomies it us impossible to get all the breast tissue out unless they go back to the radical mastectomies of the old days. Main thing is to be your own advocate make sure you continue to have mammograms or breast ultrasounds. Early detection saves lifes. We all have in the back of our minds the "what if it comes back" thought. Even those that are 20 and 30 year survivors. Remember you are a survivor, and always try to stay positive. Don't let the negative thoughts interfere in a productive happy life. I always say no matter what there is something to be thankful for every day take care

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anybody knows if positive lymph nodes change into negatives?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Positive lymph nodes are usually removed in an axillary lymph node dissection.

      Comment
    • Laura Cornwell Profile
      anonymous
      Industry Provider

      Lymph nodes cannot be determined truly positive until they are removed or biopsied. As Diana has mentioned, the lymph nodes with cancer are usually removed during breast cancer surgery. Sometimes, if lymph nodes are positive, surgeons will want to operate again to look for more positive lymph...

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      Lymph nodes cannot be determined truly positive until they are removed or biopsied. As Diana has mentioned, the lymph nodes with cancer are usually removed during breast cancer surgery. Sometimes, if lymph nodes are positive, surgeons will want to operate again to look for more positive lymph nodes with cancer in them, but fortunately, these further dissections often turn up only negative lymph nodes.

      Once a lymph node has cancer in it (and is thus positive), it would not be expected to become negative unless possibly it is treated with radiation or chemo. In women who have chemo before their surgery, lymph nodes that were sampled may clear of cancer before they are completely removed in the surgery.

      Comment
  • Susie Wilson Profile

    Stage IIB IDC. Triple negative. First chemo tomorrow. Terrified about side effects. What are the most common side effects?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Susie, I remember when I first began chemo. It's very scaring not knowing what to expect. My first go around with chemo I had 4 rounds of Adriamycin/Cytoxin followed by 4 rounds of dose dense Taxol. My main side effects during my first 4 rounds of Adriamycin/Cytoxin cocktail were nausea and...

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      Hi Susie, I remember when I first began chemo. It's very scaring not knowing what to expect. My first go around with chemo I had 4 rounds of Adriamycin/Cytoxin followed by 4 rounds of dose dense Taxol. My main side effects during my first 4 rounds of Adriamycin/Cytoxin cocktail were nausea and fatigue. They will give you something in your IV drip for nausea plus a prescription as well (usually its Zofran). Be sure to take it as directed BEFORE you get nauseous. My nausea was never bad enough to make my throw up. The meds are great...use them! My hair began to fall out on day 14 after my first chemo treatment. I decided to be proactive and had my boyfriend give me a buzz cut. My hair was very long and I didn't want to see it fall out in clumps. It was easier on me that way. And I must say...the fear and dread of losing my hair was harder than actually losing it. I need to do a new profile pic because I have about 2 inches of hair now. :).  It began growing back near my last treatment. Unfortunately I had to begin chemo again after my mastectomy but it's with 2 different drugs and I haven't lost what little hair I have this time.  :). During my last four rounds of Taxol my side effects were fatigue, changes in my nails, losing my eyelashes, eyebrows, etc., & some bone pain. I have had some neuropathy in my feet & hands but it was mild.  Taxol was easier for me.  You will probably be getting a shot of Neulasta periodically to boost you white blood count. This might give you some bone pain mostly in the upper body. If you'll take a Claritin a few hours before your Neaulasta shot and for a few days after...it will help decrease the pain. Don't ask me how it works...but it does! I have spoken to so many other omen that have sworn by it. About the only side effect that can't be controlled is the fatigue. Be kind to your body. Get lots of rest. Let others help you. Chemo isn't easy...but it's doable. If you can get in the mindset that chemo is not something that's being done to you...but think of it as an ally in your fight against cancer it will be easier to deal with. I'll keep you in my thoughts & prayers! Keep the faith & God bless you in your journey to wellness. 

      2 comments
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I forgot to mention the # 1 side effect- hair loss. I lost all of my hair- head, legs, underarm first then eyebrows and eyelashes later on. It's been just about 6 months since I first started treatments, and 2 months since I ended and my hair is finally starting to grow back! I must check 10X a...

      more

      I forgot to mention the # 1 side effect- hair loss. I lost all of my hair- head, legs, underarm first then eyebrows and eyelashes later on. It's been just about 6 months since I first started treatments, and 2 months since I ended and my hair is finally starting to grow back! I must check 10X a day to see if it's getting any longer! I'm glad I have hair again - although just a little bit! I was so sad when my hair came out, but you get through it and carry on!

      Comment

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