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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 3 - Stage 2

Stage 2 invasive breast cancer is divided into two categories, based upon the size of the tumor and whether or not the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 2A

Stage 2A invasive breast cancer can be broken down into a number of different conditions.

It can signify that there is no tumor present, but the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. It can also mean that the tumor is still 2 cm (0.8in) or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or that the the tumor is between 2cm (0.8in) and 5cm (2in), but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

Related Questions

  • kim sosa Profile

    I was diagnosed stage 2 possible stage 3A because of lymp node involvement. My doctor said I should live a full life but reading things on the internet tell me otherwise. Any reassurance will help.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Oh Darlin!
      DO NOT READ THOSE HORROR STORIES! There are many, many, more successful outcomes than awful ones. Your eyes are going to be drawn to the horrible and it won't do you a bit of good except to depress you. "Been there.... done that." I would trust what your doctor says and put on...

      more

      Oh Darlin!
      DO NOT READ THOSE HORROR STORIES! There are many, many, more successful outcomes than awful ones. Your eyes are going to be drawn to the horrible and it won't do you a bit of good except to depress you. "Been there.... done that." I would trust what your doctor says and put on your big girl pink warrior panties and slap breast cancer in it's sassy face! You are always going to find the most horrendous stories and the most depressing statistics. You are not a statistic, you are a woman who was found to have breast cancer! Big deal.... HA! I also had breast cancer with node involvment, I am in my 5th year and just saw my oncologist last Wednesday. We "high-fived" each other in celebration of another clean check-up. He told me I was doing great and told me not to worry. PLEASE....Kim, your glass is really --half-full-- and heading for all the way full. You will get through your treatment and be ok. You have a bunch of women out there who are alive today because we have received great treatment and have the support of other women who have been treated before us. HANG IN THERE, GIRL! Healing hugs and courage. Do NOT listen to negative stories... there are many more positive ones out there. God's blessings, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Kim, the ladies are right. Don't back attention to the stats online. For one thing....they're not up to date. And another...every woman is different. Only God knows when our time is up. No one else. I was stage 3C when I began my treatment last May. When they went in to do my bilateral mastectomy...

      more

      Kim, the ladies are right. Don't back attention to the stats online. For one thing....they're not up to date. And another...every woman is different. Only God knows when our time is up. No one else. I was stage 3C when I began my treatment last May. When they went in to do my bilateral mastectomy I had 13 positive lymph nodes. In three of the lymph nodes...the cancer had broken outside the node. It had also spread to my chest wall. After almost a year of treatment...I'm cancer free!!! Take a look at my bio if you'd like. Replace that internet search for survival stats with "uplifting survivor stories"!!!! You can do this Kim!! Lots of hugs, Diana

      Comment
  • Kristine Fonseca Profile

    What is the survival rate of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Stage 2, Triple Negative and what are the side effects of TAC Chemo treatments?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Hi Kristine I honestly don't have a definite answer for you regarding the survival rate . I have researched and read conflicting answers. I do know that it depends on the type of breast cancer that you are diagnosed with as well as other issues. However, I hope that you are encouraged by...

      more

      Hi Kristine I honestly don't have a definite answer for you regarding the survival rate . I have researched and read conflicting answers. I do know that it depends on the type of breast cancer that you are diagnosed with as well as other issues. However, I hope that you are encouraged by knowing that I celebrated my 5th year of being cancer free on 8/23/11. I was diagnosed with Triple Negative, Invasive and Stage 2A. I was 52 Yrs old when diagnosed and I am now 58.
      I know that God is in control of all our lives therefore I live my life a day at a time staying focused on what is most important to me and what makes me happy no matter what and that is my family and God. Follow your Dr's Advice:) always have hope, faith and love.
      Stay encouraged and enjoy each and everyday!
      Your Sister of Hope!!

      5 comments
    • Cindy Rathbun Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Don't get caught up in numbers for "survival rate." If those statistics were important, we might never drive a car! I was diagnosed w Stage 2 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Triple Neg in Jan 2008. I had chemo, lumpectomy, and radiation. This past March 2011, I felt a lump in the same...

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      Don't get caught up in numbers for "survival rate." If those statistics were important, we might never drive a car! I was diagnosed w Stage 2 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Triple Neg in Jan 2008. I had chemo, lumpectomy, and radiation. This past March 2011, I felt a lump in the same breast...diagnosed DCIS, again TNBC. I elected to have bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. Post op pathology showed 2 additional types of micro malignant cells waiting to happen. I feel totally at peace with my decision. Life is good. I am back to playing golf and exercising. Yoga and meditation are high priority for staying focused and strong. The path to wellness starts in our own minds...know it, believe it, and you will be better than ever!

      3 comments
  • Cassandra Wolff Profile

    Will the stage of breast cancer go down after chemotherapy and/or mastectomies?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      No evidence of disease is after surgery chemo and or radiation. NED days is basically the all clear.
      You had stage /-- before treatment and look
      Forward to NED days.

      Comment
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      It is my understanding that your treatment/surgeries don't reduce the stage of cancer. Staging is based on the size of tumor and if it has spread to lymph nodes or other areas of the body. There is a great video on the learn section of this site. I was stage 2 and 10 years later I still I...

      more

      It is my understanding that your treatment/surgeries don't reduce the stage of cancer. Staging is based on the size of tumor and if it has spread to lymph nodes or other areas of the body. There is a great video on the learn section of this site. I was stage 2 and 10 years later I still I have a "history" of stage 2 bc. Let us know what your doctor's answer is. Keep the questions coming! We are here for you!

      Comment
  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment

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