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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    What does this mean? My mother had breast cancer 3 years ago and went through chemotherapy and radiation, but she took a test last week & her lab value CA 19.9 was 78 ug. I'm worried about her.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      The information I read is the CA 19.9 test is for specific tumor markers. I don't know what the normal levels are so can't help you with what the 78 UG results. The details and what this test shows has changed over the years. Doctor's used to think it helped point to certain diseases but...

      more

      The information I read is the CA 19.9 test is for specific tumor markers. I don't know what the normal levels are so can't help you with what the 78 UG results. The details and what this test shows has changed over the years. Doctor's used to think it helped point to certain diseases but now.... it has changed. Hopefully, you and your Mom can sit down with her doctor and talk about her tests. It is very difficult to get test results and be left in the dark about their meaning. Take care, and give Mom a hug. Sharon

      Comment
    • bassant youssef Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thanks for ur effort

      Comment
  • Donna Sawyer Profile

    What is red breast syndrome? What causes it? How long does it last?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      The easiest thing to do is "google" the term RED BREAST SYNDROME. It is difficult to estimate duration because we are all different. It will take as long as it takes you each individual. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • T H Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Hi Donna, Think I may have it... My doctor does not think it is a infection. My right breast is red in a are by my ins

      2 comments
  • Carla Victor-rawson Profile

    Which surgery has the best survival rate, Mastectomy or Lumpectomy? I'm having my surgery Wednesday and still waffling... Help anyone!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Diane Washington Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I believe we should trust God and it a personal decision and a choice that you and you alone should be comfortable with. I chose a lumpectomy because I could but was prepared to do what ever would save my life.

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It was a hard decision for me also. I chose a lumpectomy because I could always have a mastectomy down the road. The cancer I had was in its early stages and there was no lymph node involvement. God bless you!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I had surgery on 02/09/12 and my left breast was take out, where can I get help on all the questions that I have?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is a great resource for cutting edge information. You can sign up for their monthly free newsletter. There is much information about the latests tests and treatments. It is out of Johns Hopkins. http://www.hopkinsbreastcenter.org/artemis/ You can go back into their archives.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      There are several resources besides this site. Although this site is filled with a lot of knowledgeable wise caring people that are very willing to answer your questions sharing there own experiences with you. Some other sites are Breast cancer.org and if you are considering reconstruction...

      more

      There are several resources besides this site. Although this site is filled with a lot of knowledgeable wise caring people that are very willing to answer your questions sharing there own experiences with you. Some other sites are Breast cancer.org and if you are considering reconstruction http://www.plasticsurgery.org/ this site will help you find out more about the different types of reconstruction procedures The susan love research foundation also is a great site to get answered to your questions. Also the American cancer society in your state should have a reach for recovery program. They have volunteers that you can talk to that are breast cancer survivors. This last link is a link to my personal story of my breast cancer experience I take you from my initial diagnosis my surgery bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies with reconstruction and then my recovery and reflection a year latter. Hope this helps. Take care http://home.roadrunner.com/~amj/

      Comment

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