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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My first treatment was Wednesday and so far so good. (no sickness or anything) Thank you god. I'm praying the next treatments go good too. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy...

      more

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy and tired and queasy but not enough to make me sick or keep me from doing what I usually do. Hope you're still feeling well!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope...

      more

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope you will share the positive stories of chemotherapy with anyone who is having that type of treatment. You just don't know how anyone is going to react to that stuff. Continued good luck to you. God's blessings..... Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What are the recommended medicines and doses for triple negative?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 1 answer
    • Trish Watt Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I don't know if recommended is the right word but I did go through Chemo and radiation when I was diagnosed back in 2005. My treatment involved 8 treatments of dose dense Chemo every other week followed by 6 weeks of radiation. My oncologist is at Rush Hospital in Chicago, a very well respected...

      more

      I don't know if recommended is the right word but I did go through Chemo and radiation when I was diagnosed back in 2005. My treatment involved 8 treatments of dose dense Chemo every other week followed by 6 weeks of radiation. My oncologist is at Rush Hospital in Chicago, a very well respected doctor, Melody Cobleigh. First 4 treatments were AC followed by 4 treatments of Taxol which is pretty much standard with triple negative. Mine was Stage I, Node negative, grade 3. triple negative is an aggressive type of breast cancer but they are learning more and more every year about how to treat it. I'm doing well 6 years out. If you want more info on Triple Negative Breast Cancer, they is a website at www.triplenegative.com I think. Good wishes and positive prayers to you. You will get through this!

      Comment
  • Susie Que Profile

    Is there anything that helps with neulasta? It gives me the most excruciating headache.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Probably ibuprofen is fine but definitely ask your onc

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Susie, if you haven't reported this to your Onc. I would be doing it. I didn't have that kind of side effect but we are all so different. Hang in there and talk to your doctor. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Jk Joyce Profile

    Does anyone else have really hard places in the breast after a lumpectomy and radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    almost 8 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • P C Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 0 Patient

      Hi. Yes, I have hard tissue that appeared after surgery/zero as/radiation. My oncologist said it is normal to have hard tissue. They tell me it is scar tissue. I had my first follow up mammogram and they had to magnify the digital pictures and the did a tighter compression to make sure...

      more

      Hi. Yes, I have hard tissue that appeared after surgery/zero as/radiation. My oncologist said it is normal to have hard tissue. They tell me it is scar tissue. I had my first follow up mammogram and they had to magnify the digital pictures and the did a tighter compression to make sure nothing was brewing. The radiologist told me they found nothing new, so it was only scar tissue. P

      Comment
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Around my lumpectomy incision is still pretty hard. My breast is still swollen and it hurts to lift my arm above my head sometimes. Although annoying, they are consequences of me now being cancer free-so I will put up with them. It ia kinda scary though huh

      1 comment

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