loading... close

Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • Erin Wolf-Goldstein Profile

    What meds are people taking after surgery, chemo, and radation for triple negative Breast Cancer? My Oncologst gave me Tamoxofen, but since this is hormone related feel like I need to change it, any suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    about 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Erin, I just read they have recently discovered this drug has some secondary benefits against triple negative BC. . If I were you, I would "google" tamoxifen and triple negative BC. It is good info. And another positive discovery for newer treatment. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I think you should talk to your onc. before you should do some reseach about hormone blockers for TNBC. Then you can have an informed discussian about your tratment.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Would you ladies mind helping out a southern feller? Just diagnosed with stage 2B and I have some questions. Having a (left) mastectomy and axillary removal on March 7 and wondering what to expect as far as recovery pain?

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_2b Patient
    almost 3 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I'm sorry to hear you joined this group. Everyone is different with their pain tolerance, I had none after my unilateral mastectomy and lymph node dissection. But then I had a PCA pump with Fentanyl going in it the first half day (not something I wanted but it was there none the less). Your...

      more

      I'm sorry to hear you joined this group. Everyone is different with their pain tolerance, I had none after my unilateral mastectomy and lymph node dissection. But then I had a PCA pump with Fentanyl going in it the first half day (not something I wanted but it was there none the less). Your anxiety is not going to help you as stress right now is not your friend. Try and take some deep breaths and relax, I know it's easier said then done but try, OK?

      2 comments
    • Trisha Muller Quinn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      With your burping ... due to feeling nervous you are probably swallowing more air ...

      I have had a double mastectomy with half of my nodes taken , cancerous..
      There no pain as such involved with this surgery .. just feeling happy to know that the cancer is gone .

      I don't know if you'll been...

      more

      With your burping ... due to feeling nervous you are probably swallowing more air ...

      I have had a double mastectomy with half of my nodes taken , cancerous..
      There no pain as such involved with this surgery .. just feeling happy to know that the cancer is gone .

      I don't know if you'll been having any drains ( from the chest drawing fluid away). They make it hard to sleep .

      I found the surgery the easiest with only 1 over night in hosp .

      Think of your self as bit of a Ambassador for other men !! To show them not only women get breast cancer .. but it's the same horrible cancer !!

      I have the attitude of ... What doesn't break us makes as stronger.
      I felt calmer going into surgery as I knew it would prolong my life , so it's the right thing to do !!
      Maybe you need someone to talk to before surgery to calm your fears with issues , of with ......what may happen ??

      But feel comfortable and confident we have all gone through this. And are alive to live , laugh and inform others .........We can have a long happy life after cancer so good luck ..

      3 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Today my husband shaved my head which was hard. Headed to 2nd treatment on Friday ...two more to go after this....ugh

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    almost 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Morgan Moser Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      I'm so sorry you or any of us have to go through this. This is and was the hardest part for me. My hubby shaved a Mohawk on my head. That's was Black Friday, it still sucks. I hate waking up bald! Anyway, it gets easier and you learn to deal with things you cannot change. Concentrate on the...

      more

      I'm so sorry you or any of us have to go through this. This is and was the hardest part for me. My hubby shaved a Mohawk on my head. That's was Black Friday, it still sucks. I hate waking up bald! Anyway, it gets easier and you learn to deal with things you cannot change. Concentrate on the positives as much as possible and laugh until it hurts. They say a positive attitude is half the battle and I truly believe that. Also, all of us here are ALWAYS HERE for you ANYTIME! Hang tough girly and fight like hell!!! Almost done!!!

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I'm sorry your having a hard time. It's going to be ok. Your hair doesn't define you. Look at the bright side - so much easier getting ready to go out AND, your almost done with chemo. Whoo hoo! Stay strong, you can do this. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anyone just finishing AC-T (dose dense) treatment? I will be starting in a week and would love to hear your experience.

    Asked by anonymous

    almost 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      This was not my regimen, but with any chemo it's not fun, but do-able. It does effect people differently. Usually days 2 & 3 or maybe 3 & 4 are worst. Tired, weak, queasy. After two weeks, you'll notice your hair falling out. It may even hurt. Like a ponytail too tight. Just own it, shave your...

      more

      This was not my regimen, but with any chemo it's not fun, but do-able. It does effect people differently. Usually days 2 & 3 or maybe 3 & 4 are worst. Tired, weak, queasy. After two weeks, you'll notice your hair falling out. It may even hurt. Like a ponytail too tight. Just own it, shave your head, and you'll feel so much better. If your going to wear a wig, get it now and take it to your hairdresser to cut and style. Some women continue to work, others don't. Drink lots of water to flush the chemo out, walk as much as you can and eat what tastes good. I used plastic utensils to help with the metal taste and ate salty &/or spicy foods. Along with a bottle of Tumms, lol. You can do this. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I was on ACT. I didn't find it to be horribly bad -- not as bad as I expected. However, watch out for allergic reactions. I had a fairly severe reaction to Taxotere toward the end of my treatments. A bad rash, mainly.

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 2

Inspire hope by becoming an advocate for breast cancer prevention.

spread the word