loading... close

Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Sue Rice Profile

    Stage 4 HER2+ ER+ --> Treatment is taking forever. Others finish, but I keep going. Do any others feel lonely, frustrated and depressed while watching others finish? I'm stable, but only if I continue treatment.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 4 Patient
    almost 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Donna Ginnings Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2001

      Sue, I'm stage 4 and have been since 2007. I was able to stop treatment for 3 years because of no sign of disease after first year of treatment. A miracle from God for sure. Currently I have been on chemo since July 2010. I just look at it as a small inconvenience and enjoy every day God gives...

      more

      Sue, I'm stage 4 and have been since 2007. I was able to stop treatment for 3 years because of no sign of disease after first year of treatment. A miracle from God for sure. Currently I have been on chemo since July 2010. I just look at it as a small inconvenience and enjoy every day God gives me with my daughters. Trust in the Lord, he will see you through. So many good treatment options out there that let you carry on a normal life. God never promised us life would be easy, but he did promise nerver to leave us or forsake us. may God bless you!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sue, I sure can understand how it could be very depressing to watch the other types of breast cancer women walk out the door. Your oncologist's office probably has some recommendations for support groups in your area where you could meet a pal who is dealing with the same issues you are having. ...

      more

      Sue, I sure can understand how it could be very depressing to watch the other types of breast cancer women walk out the door. Your oncologist's office probably has some recommendations for support groups in your area where you could meet a pal who is dealing with the same issues you are having. When I was going through treatment, there was a young woman on the other side of the states who was a horse-gal, just like me. We had a great time emailing each other even though she was young enough to be my daughter. It was so welcome to find somebody else who was in the "same leaky boat" as I was. It made the treatment time much easier to take. You just need a "chemo-pal." This has become a way-too-common disease to there are lots of us out there. I would try to find a support group and maybe one person who you just click with. . Be sure and talk to your doctor and Onco. nurses about how you are feeling. Ask them if they can point you in the direction of a support group. You sound like a very social person and needs some buddies. Take care and big healing hugs. Sharon

      Comment
  • Ali S Profile

    How do I go about telling someone, that I'm newly dating, that I was getting breast cancer treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    about 8 years 1 answer
    • Brooke Lancaster Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I'm curious on this question too. I am 33 and single. I would love to be able to date again, but I am afraid to talk about my Breast Cancer with a future suitor. I think with me it's a physical insecurity I'm going thru right now. I'm almost done with chemo, so I keep telling myself once I'm done...

      more

      I'm curious on this question too. I am 33 and single. I would love to be able to date again, but I am afraid to talk about my Breast Cancer with a future suitor. I think with me it's a physical insecurity I'm going thru right now. I'm almost done with chemo, so I keep telling myself once I'm done with treatment and dell like myself again.

      For you, wait to talk about it for when you feel the most comfortable. I'm sure he will be there for you thru this time. What treatment are you going thru at this time? Best wishes.

      Brooke

      3 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    My throat is soar...they said it might get like that due to radiating my lymph nodes..."If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything."

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 3 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Norma, do they have your head positioned in such a way that your throat is out of the way as much as possible? I also had my super clav area radiated and when they positioned me initially they made sure my head was turned to the left (rads on right side) and that's the way they shaped my...

      more

      Norma, do they have your head positioned in such a way that your throat is out of the way as much as possible? I also had my super clav area radiated and when they positioned me initially they made sure my head was turned to the left (rads on right side) and that's the way they shaped my pillow. They try and get your throat positioned so it's not affected. I did have a slight sore throat at one point, but it didn't last. However, if it persists for you then you need to tell someone and make sure your positioning is correct. Good luck!

      1 comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      That happened to me........the doctor and the techs had me(they were radiating my right breast) turn my head to the left. It lifted my throat out of the way. I turned my head almost 90 degrees to the left. It worked untill itworked ensure and popsicles.

      1 comment
  • Traciann brundage Profile

    Just finished my second treatment . I feel old and weak. (night sweats and can't sleep) Any tips?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Boy, it sucks, doesn't it? I'm so sorry you're having to go through this but keep your eye on the prize, even when you feel like you can't lift your head up. This stuff is KILLING those little suckers, each and every one of them! You are stronger than they are. With your will and the chemo...

      more

      Boy, it sucks, doesn't it? I'm so sorry you're having to go through this but keep your eye on the prize, even when you feel like you can't lift your head up. This stuff is KILLING those little suckers, each and every one of them! You are stronger than they are. With your will and the chemo working against them, THEY WILL NOT WIN.

      Now, for the sleep thing. I also take Trazadone. The dose has varied from 100 to 400 mg a night, depending on how difficult it is for me to sleep. (I'm on Aromasin (Eximestane) now, and it gives me terrible insomnia!) The good thing about Trazadone is that it's not addictive and doesn't give you the weird side effects you can get from other sleep meds like Ambien.

      Exercise will also help you. I imagine that's the last thing you can think about, but i figured that just getting up and walking around the house was exercise so I did it and I think it helped!

      Best of luck to you!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Oh Traciann.... you WILL start to feel better. Keep in mind, the chemo is kicking-butt to any cancer cells RIGHT NOW! It is doing what it is supposed to do. You bide your time, listen to your body, drink plenty of fluids and indulge yourself in some --caring-time-- for you. This is tough and...

      more

      Oh Traciann.... you WILL start to feel better. Keep in mind, the chemo is kicking-butt to any cancer cells RIGHT NOW! It is doing what it is supposed to do. You bide your time, listen to your body, drink plenty of fluids and indulge yourself in some --caring-time-- for you. This is tough and expected. You are right in the middle of it.... you take care of yourself, dear sister. Hang in there, we know how you are feeling and it does get better.
      Warm, fuzzy pony hugs. Sharon

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word