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Will I be able to care for my cats (liter boxes, feeding etc) when I have chemo and radiation treatments?

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Asked by

anonymous

Learning About Breast Cancer over 7 years
 
  • Tiffani Warila Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    During treatments, I did everything that was part of my regular routine (including taking care of my cats- litter, food etc, and working daily as a kindergarten para- with the boogie noses and all)! I had a good immune system to begin with, so i just made sure to wash my hands and sanitize. I only got one sore throat during treatments and was put on antibiotics as a precaution. Do what is best for you and you will be fine!
    about 7 years Comment Flag
  • Sharon Danielson Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2007
    Anonymous: My Onc. was dead set against litter box cleaning when I was going through chemo. because of the possibility of picking up some kind of disease. Feeding my kitty's was ok. My hubby took over litter box cleaning. My onc. also did not want me to spend any time around my horses. Being with my horses is like --life-- to me. I took care of all of my animals, including my 7 horses as much as I could. When I couldn't, my wonderful Husband was always there to share the load. Trying to make me stay away from my animals was just not going to happen. I took my chances, and never had any kind of illness. I was fastidious about keeping my hands washed but my animals were and are part of my reason for living. If you get the word you can't clean litter boxes, ask if it would be acceptable if you wore gloves and a mask? I can't imagine you would lesson your chances of picking up any kind of disease. Take care, Sharon
    over 7 years Flag
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      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thank you for your response. I have two long haired Maine Coon cats and they require a fair amount of care and my husband has a job where he will be away two weeks at time and then home two weeks at a time. When he is gone the full...

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      Thank you for your response. I have two long haired Maine Coon cats and they require a fair amount of care and my husband has a job where he will be away two weeks at time and then home two weeks at a time. When he is gone the full responsibility will fall upon me. I have been considering finding them a good home, as I was concerned. It was so nice to hear your words.

      over 7 years Flag
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Don't give up your kitties.... you ARE their good home. There is always a way to work around little bumps in the road. Your treatment is just a blip on the radar. Even if you have to hire a kid to come over and clean your litter box. Things...

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      Don't give up your kitties.... you ARE their good home. There is always a way to work around little bumps in the road. Your treatment is just a blip on the radar. Even if you have to hire a kid to come over and clean your litter box. Things will work out. Trying to find homes for your kitties would bring on a whole lot of stress. You will find a way to get through your treatment and hang on to those beautiful kitties too. They will add much to your spiritual wellbeing. I figure my horses manes must have soaked up gallons of my tears while I was going through treatment. Hang in there, it will all work. Hugs to you and your kitties. Sharon

      over 7 years Flag
  • vicki e Profile
    anonymous
    Stage 2B Patient
    There was a CNN report about toxoplasmosis being a risk factor when handling litter boxes during chemo. It may not be worth the risk . Here is the essence of the article: Anyone can become infected with toxoplasmosis. The parasite is found throughout the world. You're at risk of serious health problems if: You have HIV/AIDS. Many people with HIV/AIDS also have toxoplasmosis. In some cases, the infection is recent, and in others, an old infection has become active again. You're undergoing chemotherapy. Chemotherapy affects your immune system, making it difficult for your body to fight even minor infections. You take steroids or other immunosuppressant drugs. Medications used to treat certain nonmalignant conditions suppress your immune system and make you more likely to develop complications of toxoplasmosis. You're pregnant. If you have active toxoplasmosis, treatment can reduce the risk to your baby. If you've already had toxoplasmosis before becoming pregnant, you generally can't pass the infection to your baby. ©1998-2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). Terms of use. Read this article on Mayoclinic.com.
    about 7 years Comment Flag
  • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2009
    I took care of my cats n dogs. You should ask ur doc.
    about 7 years Comment Flag
  • laura  bailey Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    I used disposable gloves when doing pet care during chemo, just be careful to wash your hands with anti bac. soap after.
    about 7 years Comment Flag
  • Kristy Davis Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2009
    I never stopped taking care of my cat's boxes. However, my kitties are strictly indoors. If you have kitties that go outside, I would recommend that you have someone else scoop them during Chemo when your white blood cell counts are down. Radiation shouldn't lower your counts, so you should be okay to do it then.
    about 7 years Comment Flag

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