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I am in my last two weeks of radiation. Going back to work in a month but can't seem to say I am cancer free. Does anyone ever really know?

Jacquie B Profile
Asked by

anonymous

Learning About Breast Cancer over 7 years
 
  • Lysa Allison Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    Consider yourself cancer free; I do. We don't know if we may get cancer again but worrying about it won't keep it from happening. We have done all we can do at this point. Why not live your life as a victor
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Erin Timlin Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2011
    If your pathology has come back clear you can definitely say you are cancer free!! They don't use the word "remission" like they do with a cancer like leukemia, for example, but cancer free is cancer free. I think half the battle is mental, so start thinking and BELIEVING that you are CANCER FREE and you will be!! Good luck!
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Nancy Ries Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2011
    Jacquie, I think that it is important for we survivors to recognize that breast cancer is part if who we are. But I don't think that we can allow it to define who we are. Enjoy your life. We are cancer free until there is something to prove otherwise. Live your life to its fullest and believe that you are cancer free.
    over 7 years Flag
    • terri chambers Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Nancy you are so right .. I feel the same way most of the time... Thank you for sharing your though with all of us...

      over 7 years Flag
  • Roz Potenza Profile
    anonymous
    Patient
    Jacquie, I have three more weeks of radiation left and my doctor calls it 100% remission. I call it Cancer Free. Like someone else said, part of the battle is mental and for me, once my hair grows back and I look less like a cancer patient, I will think of myself as cured. Life throws things your way. Just take it as it comes. And congrats!!! :)
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Thumb avatar default
    anonimamente
    Aprendendo sobre o câncer de mama
    I agree with Erin 100%. Thanks Erin
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2012
    Oh, Jacquie. I remember having the same thoughts. The lurking thought that there are a few nasty cells left somewhere is just awful. It goes away after a while, as your mammograms and other tests come back clear and your doctors start to spread out the time between visits. We really never know. But you've had the appropriate treatment and have been given every chance that all the cancer is gone. Right now you should consider yourself cancer-free. Try to proceed as if you are, because the odds are heavily in your favor. It's easy for me to say, I know. But I just finished chemo in March for my second bout with breast cancer and I'm on the same track you are. I know the chance is always there, but I refuse to let it get me. Every day is a gift and I'm sure you'll get a lot of them! Hang in there!
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Jacquie B Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    Thanks so much my fellow Sister!! Such great advice. I will run with it. The lurk over my shoulder is the fact, I opted out of chemo due to my low Oncotype DX score of 10. I did have a microscopic amount of cancer is 1 lymph node. 25 radiation treatments and 8 boosts. 6 boots left. Once it's all done life will go on. Thanks again for all the good advice!!
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • anonymous Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2012
    I'm feeling like I can be sure until they do my follow up mammogram. I have to wait until April. I guess I need proof. Once that's done and they tell me it's gone I'm going to feel a lot better knowing its gone for sure.
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Joni Dempsey Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    Jacque, I feel the same since I opted out of chemo for a low Oncotype score. Cancer is gone but I guess you are kind of waiting for the shoe to drop. Good advice from all these other people though!!!
    over 7 years Comment Flag

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