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What have people done to change fear into power?

Alysia Krafel Profile
Asked by

anonymous

Stage 1 Patient about 7 years
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  • Sharon Danielson Profile
    anonimamente
    Sobrevivente desde 2007
    Alysia, I was the most fearful person before I went through breast cancer treatment. When faced with it, I made up my mind the faster I got through the treatment the better. I looked forward to each and every bit of the treatment. I honestly felt a surge of adrenalin going though me and met every appointment with a "lets get this done" attitude. I also kept an online blog to my horse community (mostly women) and took them through treatment with me. I wanted women to not be scared. I wanted them to see this as positive and to not be afraid of being diagnosed if that is what happened. I felt like I had to pretend to be brave at first but then, I actually turned out to have a lot more courage than I would have ever imagined. I wanted people to know I was not dying and that early stage breast cancer was treatable. As you go through the diagnosis stage, you ARE fearful because you are wandering around in unknown territory. Once you get a diagnosis and treatment plan, you actually feel a lot better. You then know what is out in front of you. You DO gain strength just going through the process. You never look at life in the same way either. After having breast cancer, there are no more bad days in my book. Life is so much sweeter. Hang in there, darlin' you are still in the shocked stage. Things will get better. Take care and big fuzzy pony hugs to you. We are all sisters here. Sharon
    about 7 years Comment Flag
  • Thumb avatar default
    anonymous
    Stage 2B Patient
    Hi Alysia, I am new at this myself... and I am NOT courageous. FEAR has become part of this horrible disease, but I have learned that FEAR can be a motivator. First, I wanted to live, so I did what my doctors told me to, nonetheless, I challenged them, I googled everything and asked a lot of questions. Then when I was comfortable with their answer, it helped to subdue that fear and I went with the treatment recommended by specialist. Secondly a good motivator to fear was to become as healthy as I possibly can and to educate myself about the disease and other side effects. Spiritual fear? Well that depends on your spirituality, I am still working on that. Depending if you believe or not, this might be a big help. Your mind... well I am a negative person, so telling me to be positive is like telling a person to empty the ocean a cup at a time... so... if you can,get help and turn your fear into positive energy, I am looking for a psychiatrist that can help me to turn this into a positive. Fear is poison, that I know, so do whatever you can to destroy it. I believe that Fear is another cancer, and not so easily done with. But asking the right and many questions to your health providers, surrounding yourself with friends that love you, will help enormously. Good luck to you :) Gentle Hugs, Radiation Girl
    about 7 years Flag
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      " fear is poison" is perfectly said. You are so right it is a cancer by itself.
      Thank you

      about 7 years Flag
    • Alysia Krafel Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      So I will work on an antidote to this poison. I am thinking that the new chapter in my life here will teach me some new visions. I hope wisdom can grow from facing it. I hope I come out stronger for facing it. Lots of hopes right now. Stomach...

      more

      So I will work on an antidote to this poison. I am thinking that the new chapter in my life here will teach me some new visions. I hope wisdom can grow from facing it. I hope I come out stronger for facing it. Lots of hopes right now. Stomach is still in knots.

      about 7 years Flag
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonimamente
      Sobrevivente desde 2011

      It is life changing experience. With almost 2 years under my belt(and my hair back) I am certainly not the same. I find me easier to live with.

      about 7 years Flag
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I love the comment about emptying the ocean one cup at a time.

      about 7 years Flag
  • Erin Timlin Profile
    anonimamente
    Sobrevivente desde 2011
    I felt the same way as Sharon -- motivated to get it done...one treatment at a time. One thing that helped me a ton was THE SECRET. I had read the book years ago and was unmoved (never saw the movie) BUT the CD's were life changing. There is one CD in particular on healing (set of 5) and it's all about the power of positive thinking and attracting what you want with your thoughts. It may sound like a little hocus pocus, but I got so much power out of it. I was a more pessimistic person by nature, so this really helped snap me out of the 'doom and gloom' mentality and think about nothing but health, wellness, healing, etc. The whole theory is that disease cannot live in a body where the mind is in a healthy emotional state. So instead of thinking about fear, and tumors and sickness (which you would attract) you think about health and strength and healing! I swear, I visualized every day (in the shower, at yoga, wherever) that the tumor was shrinking, with every blast of hot water or every exhale during a yoga move...I blasted it out of me! And I had a total response to chemo -- cancer was gone! The CD suggests when people ask you how you are, even if you're feeling cruddy, you say GREAT! There is no need to dwell on unhealthy emotions or nasty side effects (even though you will feel them). People saw me as such a positive inspiration through it all. I didn't complain, I went to work, I took care of my family. Sometimes I felt like dirt and sometimes I cried. But I constantly reminded myself of what I wanted which was to be healthy and caner free, and I would sometimes go these powerful words and others before falling asleep. I've done it for many things since as well (it is supposed to work for money, relationships, etc) and I feel like a much more positive person overall as a result!!! Alysia, the dark days are normal, but YOU have the power to get out of a fearful mindset and change your mindset. Will that cancer right out of your body -- envision it gone. Ask. Believe. Receive. I swear, it gave me such great power! Good luck!!!
    about 7 years Comment Flag
  • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2012
    Alysia, I've had BC twice now. i know how fear can get the best of you. You know that saying about making lemonade out of lemons? It's so goofy and I would have been really ticked off if someone tossed it to me during treatment. But it's really the only way to go. I decided that if I give into the fear, it wins. My choices were (a) crawl under the covers and never come out because of what might happen, or (b) enjoy every single day and fill it with people I love and things I love to do. You're in the right place. We've all experienced the fear and we've all had to figure out how to deal with it. Lots of compassion and care on this site! Lastly, here's a video on fear, starring me! I posted it on my blog (I'm going to Everest Base Camp next year and I'm blogging away). Enjoy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-UsEXEAPsc
    about 7 years Flag
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Oh, and just so you know I still have a sense of humor....

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrSvxItl6Dc

      about 7 years Flag
    • Alysia Krafel Profile
      anonimamente
      Stage 1 Paciente

      Thank you for the video. Thank you for talking about the fear. It is something you just can't get ready for.

      about 7 years Flag
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      You're welcome. We all feel it and we can sympathize with each other. But it actually was very hard to talk about because it's so personal. Anything to help others who have to go through it.

      about 7 years Flag
    • Jennifer Jones Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Evelyn, did you have one breast removed and then got cancer in the other breast? I had cancer and had a mastectomy in Sept. I'm trying to decide wether to have the other breast off.

      about 7 years Flag
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Hi Jennifer, yep -- I had a mastectomy then I got cancer in my remaining breast. I'm BRCA2+ so that explains it. The second one wasn't a recurrence, but a new cancer.

      Honestly, I asked them to take the other breast when I first had cancer in...

      more

      Hi Jennifer, yep -- I had a mastectomy then I got cancer in my remaining breast. I'm BRCA2+ so that explains it. The second one wasn't a recurrence, but a new cancer.

      Honestly, I asked them to take the other breast when I first had cancer in 2000. Every doctor discouraged me from doing it, telling me I was "cured" and that there was no reason for it. I don't think the BRCA genetic testing was available back then -- it wasn't offered to me, anyway. Of course in retrospect I should have pushed for it back then. It would have saved me from.....well, you know.

      I think for you it depends on many factors. What stage your cancer was, whether it was hormone receptor +, things like that. I encourage everyone to get the genetic testing. I had absolutely no idea, because no one in my family had ever had breast cancer. I suppose it also depends on your family history and other risk factors.

      So I wish I had had the double way back when. I should have pushed. But everyone's different; I'd talk to your doc about it, and I'd also make a list of pro's and con's. Make sure your doc understands your concerns.

      Best of luck, Jennifer.

      about 7 years Flag
  • André Roberts Profile
    anonimamente
    Stage 1 Paciente
    Alysia, as always, Sharon summed it up. She was a gift for saying all the right things. The not knowing & waiting is the hardest part. Everything went so fast & I was in such a whirl wind to have fear. I just stayed positive. It is all very do-able. It wasn't until after my last chemo that I freaked out. I thought 'oh no, I'm not fighting anymore'. I got over that quickly tho. Life is better now. We do look at things differently. Stay strong & know you are not alone. Prayers to you.
    about 7 years Comment Flag

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