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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Melissa Costello Profile

    I have two adjacent Spiculated Masses with Pleomorphic Microcalcifications in the Right Breast corresponding to the palpable area, 5 on BIRADS - highly suspicious for malignancy . Am having biopsy with surgeon.Any thoughts on what to expect next?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 3 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The biopsy isn't to bad. Mine was a needle assisted by ultra sound. I think the waiting for the results was the hardest. I got the cancer diagnoses 24 hours after the biopsy but the full results took 3 days. It felt like 6 months my freaking out didn't help. Hang in there lean on your faith and...

      more

      The biopsy isn't to bad. Mine was a needle assisted by ultra sound. I think the waiting for the results was the hardest. I got the cancer diagnoses 24 hours after the biopsy but the full results took 3 days. It felt like 6 months my freaking out didn't help. Hang in there lean on your faith and maybe a little xanex.

      Comment
    • Roz Potenza Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I can't speak to your particular diagnosis but I can tell you that the biopsy was pretty easy, looking back. I was wide awake, got a local and they took 5 core samples. I had my biopsy on a Friday, lived through the world's LONGEST Easter weekend and then got my positive diagnosis on Monday. ...

      more

      I can't speak to your particular diagnosis but I can tell you that the biopsy was pretty easy, looking back. I was wide awake, got a local and they took 5 core samples. I had my biopsy on a Friday, lived through the world's LONGEST Easter weekend and then got my positive diagnosis on Monday. Start to finish, I had treatment for 7 months and now I am 3 months done and find it's hard believe I've done it all. I wish you a swift journey to the other side of treatment as well.

      Comment
  • Connie Logan Profile

    My oncologist says he never had this question asked in 20 years., and all the doctors he asked said it should not interfere with my right side loss of nodes and it can be put there. I hope it will be okay.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    about 8 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Connie, are you referring to a port being placed?

      1 comment
    • Connie Logan Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Sorry Sharon I had more to that question but it's somewhere else since I messed up posting. It was. About a port being put on the side where lymph nodes were removed. I had a bilateral mastectomy. But the doctors relented and they are putting the port on the other side tomorrow. I think I may...

      more

      Sorry Sharon I had more to that question but it's somewhere else since I messed up posting. It was. About a port being put on the side where lymph nodes were removed. I had a bilateral mastectomy. But the doctors relented and they are putting the port on the other side tomorrow. I think I may have made too much of a pain out of myself after reading more about it

      Comment
  • gina richardson Profile

    Tomorrow is the big day that I start chemo. My nerves ate starting to get the best of me. Any last minute tips for a first timer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 16 answers
    • View all 16 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Gina,

      You WILL BE OK! You are nervous because you have no idea what's up with the appointment. My sessions were always about two hours. The port makes it much easier. I did not have any numbing cream but I don't remember it ever being painful. They run saline to clear your line, and a bit of...

      more

      Gina,

      You WILL BE OK! You are nervous because you have no idea what's up with the appointment. My sessions were always about two hours. The port makes it much easier. I did not have any numbing cream but I don't remember it ever being painful. They run saline to clear your line, and a bit of Heperan (sp) to keep it from clotting. I got a metalic taste but that went away. They bring in your "Recipe" in bags, hang them on a "tree" and start running it. At some point, they bring in a HUGE syringe of "red stuff" and inject it into your line. You feel nothing. I always asked them questions, not out of fear but genuine interest. Bring your electronic gadgets with you, your phone, a great book, snacks, water, etc. I would fall asleep because they gave me some kind of additive that made me sleepy. (they probably just wanted to shut me up for a while) Honestly, I looked forward to my appointments because each one meant I was another step closer to being done. I made friends of the staff, looked foward to seeing them and talking. The same with the patients. I never found it to be a bad experience. I would much rather have been playing with my horses but try to "make lemonade" out of your chemo appointments! Hang in there Gina, you will be ok. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Karen G Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I had my first one a week ago Thursday. I was also really nervous but at the end of the day I had to say it wasn't so bad. If you have a port it also makes it easier just make sure to use the Emla cream to numb it. They have me a Saline Drip first. Than I got my premeds a Steroid, Emend (for...

      more

      I had my first one a week ago Thursday. I was also really nervous but at the end of the day I had to say it wasn't so bad. If you have a port it also makes it easier just make sure to use the Emla cream to numb it. They have me a Saline Drip first. Than I got my premeds a Steroid, Emend (for Nausea) and Pepcid to coat your Stomach before the Chemo drugs go in. I am on the AC T regimen so the nurse pushed the Adriamycin in while I sucked on an ice pop to prevent mouth sores. After that they gave me the Cytoxin through the IV bag. You don't feel any of this going in. I was there for 5 hours but it usually is supposed to take 3-4. Bring some snacks and a light lunch with you and a water bottle (drink a lot to flush out the drugs). I brought a book with me but was too nervous to read. My husband came with me too only because it was my first time and I was scared. Before you know it it is over. Hope this helps.

      1 comment
  • sasha nelly Profile

    Is a 3d mammogram better/more accurate at detecting breast cancer plz help lady's Aussie girl with a sick mummy??xx

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Jo Rogers Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Just saw my doctor yesterday, and he wants me to have a 3D mammogram at my next . He says that they are better for dense breast tissue, and regular mammograms are just fine for fatty breast tissue. Hope this helps. Good luck to your mom.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Stay strong for you Mum and be sure you go to her appointments. I did not have 3d but I am glad for all of the technologies out there that saved my life. Blessings to you and Mum ♡

      Comment

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