loading... close

Renee's Story

About her story

"I will still smile and I will still fight."

After discovering a lump during a self-breast exam, Renee scheduled a doctor's appointment and was later diagnosed with an aggressive form of Stage 4 breast cancer.

"The moment I heard that I had breast cancer, I had a game plan in my head that I was going to fight," said Renee.

Renee's prognosis for treatment was difficult, but she decided early on that she was going to fight. Even after losing the use of her legs, Renee faced breast cancer with a smile.

Watch Renee's story and discover why her inspiring testimony and life touched the hearts of the producers, directors, and staff behind the National Breast Cancer Foundation's Beyond the Shock program.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Someone close to me had radiation treatment and something involving a needle needle. She is in her early forties. The lump on her chest has a scar about 12 cm long. What is the risk of her dying?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Not knowing anything about her or her cancer it is difficult to say. She may look as if she is dying because chemo can make you not feel very well. Losing your hair is NOT the look you want to have either! Turn your thinking around about her. Think of this as being a tough time for her while...

      more

      Not knowing anything about her or her cancer it is difficult to say. She may look as if she is dying because chemo can make you not feel very well. Losing your hair is NOT the look you want to have either! Turn your thinking around about her. Think of this as being a tough time for her while she is going through the treatment. This is helping her get rid of any cancer cells that might be lingering in her body. Don't think of her as if she if going to die, think of her as this is going to help her live a good long life. We are all doing that right here on this board. Be positive for her sake, she needs everyone's support right now. She WILL be ok. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Can clarify the situation ?

      Comment
  • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile

    How do I tell my kids?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 1996
    over 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 1996

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered...

      more

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered with simple words. What I wanted them to understand was that I was very sick, that I was fighting hard and that there was a pretty good chance that I would win the battle. I tried to give a message of hope. 15 years later, we talk about it and they say they appreciated understanding progressively.

      1 comment
    • Elise Merchant Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me...

      more

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me straight out that it was and that she was going to be fine :)

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How long did you have wait to start radiation after chemotherapy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      4 to 5 weeks. It gives you a chance to heal a little bit.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Usually about 4-5 weeks after. God bless.

      Comment
  • alison white Profile

    What is the survival rate for stage 4 when it has spread to the bones?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Susan Green Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Alison, please go to the CTCA website where you can chat with a professional who deals with all types of cancer care and treatments. They were very helpful to me when I was first diagnosed. I was diagnosed with stage 2a, so can not give you an educated answer, as I believe they can. There are...

      more

      Alison, please go to the CTCA website where you can chat with a professional who deals with all types of cancer care and treatments. They were very helpful to me when I was first diagnosed. I was diagnosed with stage 2a, so can not give you an educated answer, as I believe they can. There are also some really great women on this site who have been through a lot of different cancers and treatments who may also help. Good luck to you! I hope someone can help you!

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word