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Patsy's Story

About her story

"I know the feeling that you must be having if you've just been diagnosed or you have a loved one that's just been diagnosed with breast cancer."

In February 2002, Patsy discovered a lump and scheduled a mammogram with her doctor. The doctor performed a biopsy and diagnosed Patsy with Stage 2 breast cancer.

Patsy described her diagnosis, "like lightening had hit me. I was knocked to the ground."
But, like so many, Patsy relied on the strength of her family and friends to look at the hope in each day and to overcome breast cancer.

Hear Patsy's story and learn how she was not alone in her diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • Roberta Galipeau Wilson-Taff Martin Profile

    I need help with early detection. I have no insurance or job. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Roberta,
      So I went to one of my best friend's "Mr. Google". The Health Department in your town WILL do breast screenings. Here is the office and phone numbers. It also had a list of services they perform. This is the part that pertains to you. You call them tomorrow and get in to get a...

      more

      Roberta,
      So I went to one of my best friend's "Mr. Google". The Health Department in your town WILL do breast screenings. Here is the office and phone numbers. It also had a list of services they perform. This is the part that pertains to you. You call them tomorrow and get in to get a mammogram .... please! Keep scrolling down. Sharon
      Clinic Location & Contact Information

      1808 South Hickory
      Sapulpa, Oklahoma 74066
      (918) 224-5531 Phone
      (918) 224-1739 Fax

      Adult Health
      Clinic provides annual health exams for adults of all ages both male and female. Services included are: Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening and treatment referral, Prostate Education, Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD’s) testing, along with screening and monitoring of the following chronic diseases; Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      PLEASE LOOK FOR MY SECOND POSTING... I FOUND THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN YOUR TOWN THAT WILL DO BREAST SCREENINGS (MAMMOGRAMS) ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBERS INCLUDED. Sharon

      Roberta,
      My other "Sisters" here have given you good advice about where to check for care. Right now, what you need is a...

      more

      PLEASE LOOK FOR MY SECOND POSTING... I FOUND THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN YOUR TOWN THAT WILL DO BREAST SCREENINGS (MAMMOGRAMS) ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBERS INCLUDED. Sharon

      Roberta,
      My other "Sisters" here have given you good advice about where to check for care. Right now, what you need is a mammogram. I would also check with the closest American Cancer Society, Planned Parenthood, Susan G. Komen.Org. The latter two, generally have funding for free mammograms. October, is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. You have proven in spite of so many tough breaks in your life to be one stong cookie and a complete and total survivor. I wouldn't go pushing the breast cancer panic button. So many times, these can turn out to be nothing more than a scary time! Please start checking these places TOMORROW! I want you to get in to have a mammogram somewhere asap. We care about what you are going through right now. PLEASE keep in touch with us. We will help and support you as much as we can out here. Take care and God's blessings, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Are there different types of "aggressive" Breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      The three that I know of are inflammatory, paget's disease, and metaplastic. These are all RARE and aggressive.
      Other types of breast cancer can be thought of as a more aggressive version because of their grade. The grading is either 1, 2, or 3. One, being slower growing where 3, grows and...

      more

      The three that I know of are inflammatory, paget's disease, and metaplastic. These are all RARE and aggressive.
      Other types of breast cancer can be thought of as a more aggressive version because of their grade. The grading is either 1, 2, or 3. One, being slower growing where 3, grows and spreads faster. The other key to breast cancer is early detection. If breast cancer is detected at a later stage, it is more difficult to --corral the bugger.-- NOT impossible, but more difficult. The patient just has to spend more --quality time-- with her oncologist, surgeon, etc.
      The more I learn about breast cancer, the more there is to understand. Science keeps peeling away the layers of the unknown regarding breast cancer. We, as patients benefit from their discoveries.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Barbara  Franzen Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Also it makes a difference if your receptors are positive or negative. But, all are treatable. The kind you have and the postive or negative receptors determine the type of treatment you will advised to have. Good luck to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Hi! I have just been diagnosed and go for surgery in about 10 days. How long after surgery will I be able to get back to my daily jogging and exercise classes? Also, Will I still be able to jog and go to gym during radiation therapy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I agree with the above answer. It depends... on the type of surgery you have. Are you going to have a lumpetomy, mastectomy with just sentinal nodes or full axillary type surgery? Everybody reacts in their own way. You may feel weak and tired. You also need to let your body recover from the...

      more

      I agree with the above answer. It depends... on the type of surgery you have. Are you going to have a lumpetomy, mastectomy with just sentinal nodes or full axillary type surgery? Everybody reacts in their own way. You may feel weak and tired. You also need to let your body recover from the anesthetic and just the trauma of the surgery. After my mastectomy, I was pretty much back to normal even before the drain was removed. The first two days, I was very, very, tired. I had --zero-- post operative pain. That being said.... I am just one person on one end of the spectrum. There are plenty of other women who had the opposite reaction to a mastectomy. If you have a mastectomy, and plan to have reconstruction, during the mastectomy process, an expander is placed. The expander can give you some grief because I have yet to hear of anyone saying they didn't have discomfort. You probably will be free to do any kind of exercise you feel up to but always check with your surgeon. I am sure your surgeon would be leery of any really vigorous exercise that might cause bleeding or dislodging of drains. You need to listen to your body.... if you are tired, rest. We all have the desire to get back to normal as soon as we can. Don't try to push yourself to do something that is too much. It may set you back in the healing process. I am not saying to become a couch potato, just cooperate with your body to allow it to heal. Please keep in touch with us here. We are here to help support one another through and after this journey. Take care, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It will depend on what type of surgery you will be having, you would need more down time for a mastectomy than you would for a lumpectomy. Not sure about jogging and exercise classes you may have to give the gym a miss for a short time. Good luck

      1 comment
  • Karen W Profile

    What tests, which type of drs., & how much time before the IBC diagnosis?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      See your OB/GYN or primary care with your concern. They might want to mess around treating for an infection which it might be. This is a rare type of BC but what you are after is a biopsy ultimately. You will be referred for a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy. The amount of time for all of...

      more

      See your OB/GYN or primary care with your concern. They might want to mess around treating for an infection which it might be. This is a rare type of BC but what you are after is a biopsy ultimately. You will be referred for a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy. The amount of time for all of this to take place is unknown because you are working with offices, labs and schedules. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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