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Patsy's Story

About her story

"I know the feeling that you must be having if you've just been diagnosed or you have a loved one that's just been diagnosed with breast cancer."

In February 2002, Patsy discovered a lump and scheduled a mammogram with her doctor. The doctor performed a biopsy and diagnosed Patsy with Stage 2 breast cancer.

Patsy described her diagnosis, "like lightening had hit me. I was knocked to the ground."
But, like so many, Patsy relied on the strength of her family and friends to look at the hope in each day and to overcome breast cancer.

Hear Patsy's story and learn how she was not alone in her diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • Rachael Leslie Profile

    My girlfriend was diagnosed with breast cancer yesterday. The appointment with the surgeon is next week to get specific answers. I want to do anything and everything I can to help her through this. Any advice is very much needed and appreciated!

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    almost 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your...

      more

      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your support. Go with her to her appointments.... the diagnostic ones will be particularly important. She will need someone to --take notes-- as she will never be able to remember most of what is being said. This is a step by step process. Try to keep her from going to the really dark side. There are a ton of positive stories and outcomes to this lousy diagnosis. We, here, are living proof. Some of the journey's have been very tough but these strong women are here to share their struggles and outcomes. You are a dear friend to want to help her through this battle. Please stay in touch with us, we are here to help you and her along her path. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because...

      more

      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because when you are with the doctor we patients go blank I don't know how many times I was going to ask this that or the other thing and get into the office and I go blank my husband would just chime in for me Be patient with your girlfriend she will be on a whirlwind of emotions. Hold her tell her it's okay to talk about it all with you let her know your feelings also. My husband and I held each other up luckily one was always stronger then the other on those bad days. I have a link on my profile to my story of my personal experience with breast cancer in 2003. I take you from the initial diagnosis the biopsy surgery and recovery with a reflection a year later. Even though my type of breast cancer or choice of treatment may be different I hope by sharing my experience it will help other women and there family. http://home.roadrunner.com/~amj/

      Comment
  • Alysia Krafel Profile

    What have people done to change fear into power?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    about 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Alysia,
      I was the most fearful person before I went through breast cancer treatment. When faced with it, I made up my mind the faster I got through the treatment the better. I looked forward to each and every bit of the treatment. I honestly felt a surge of adrenalin going though me and met...

      more

      Alysia,
      I was the most fearful person before I went through breast cancer treatment. When faced with it, I made up my mind the faster I got through the treatment the better. I looked forward to each and every bit of the treatment. I honestly felt a surge of adrenalin going though me and met every appointment with a "lets get this done" attitude. I also kept an online blog to my horse community (mostly women) and took them through treatment with me. I wanted women to not be scared. I wanted them to see this as positive and to not be afraid of being diagnosed if that is what happened. I felt like I had to pretend to be brave at first but then, I actually turned out to have a lot more courage than I would have ever imagined. I wanted people to know I was not dying and that early stage breast cancer was treatable. As you go through the diagnosis stage, you ARE fearful because you are wandering around in unknown territory. Once you get a diagnosis and treatment plan, you actually feel a lot better. You then know what is out in front of you. You DO gain strength just going through the process. You never look at life in the same way either. After having breast cancer, there are no more bad days in my book. Life is so much sweeter. Hang in there, darlin' you are still in the shocked stage. Things will get better. Take care and big fuzzy pony hugs to you. We are all sisters here. Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Hi Alysia, I am new at this myself... and I am NOT courageous. FEAR has become part of this horrible disease, but I have learned that FEAR can be a motivator. First, I wanted to live, so I did what my doctors told me to, nonetheless, I challenged them, I googled everything and asked a lot of...

      more

      Hi Alysia, I am new at this myself... and I am NOT courageous. FEAR has become part of this horrible disease, but I have learned that FEAR can be a motivator. First, I wanted to live, so I did what my doctors told me to, nonetheless, I challenged them, I googled everything and asked a lot of questions. Then when I was comfortable with their answer, it helped to subdue that fear and I went with the treatment recommended by specialist. Secondly a good motivator to fear was to become as healthy as I possibly can and to educate myself about the disease and other side effects.

      Spiritual fear? Well that depends on your spirituality, I am still working on that. Depending if you believe or not, this might be a big help.

      Your mind... well I am a negative person, so telling me to be positive is like telling a person to empty the ocean a cup at a time... so... if you can,get help and turn your fear into positive energy, I am looking for a psychiatrist that can help me to turn this into a positive.

      Fear is poison, that I know, so do whatever you can to destroy it. I believe that Fear is another cancer, and not so easily done with. But asking the right and many questions to your health providers, surrounding yourself with friends that love you, will help enormously.
      Good luck to you :) Gentle Hugs, Radiation Girl

      4 comments
  • Mrs. Collins Profile

    I was diagnosed last week with breast cancer. didn't have pain until after biopsy & MRI... any suggestions? Besides this... I'm terribly frightened of"The Unknown". Which makes it Hard to be Positive!! Any suggestions PLEASE?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      The Breast Cancer journey is a roller coaster ride, but you, like the courageous women on this site, will get through it! Write down questions before doctor appointments, take notes and bring someone with you to help retain the info. Keep copies of your test results. Use only reputable...

      more

      The Breast Cancer journey is a roller coaster ride, but you, like the courageous women on this site, will get through it! Write down questions before doctor appointments, take notes and bring someone with you to help retain the info. Keep copies of your test results. Use only reputable internet sites like the American Cancer Society and breastcancer.org. and limit your search time. Reach out to community bc resources in your area. Contact the American Cancer Society about programs. Take time to do things that bring you joy and distract you so cancer does not consume you! Surround yourself with positive people. Honor your body and rest when you need to. Keep us posted on your treatment plan and keep the questions coming. We are here for you!!!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Mrs Collins, when you hear the words its devastating and your life has forever changed. You will have your ups and downs but just remember you have so many here to support you. Love yourselve and hold on tightly. From this moment on, You are a warrior. We love you and hold your faith close.

      Comment
  • Kristine Fonseca Profile

    Has anyone had DIEP (using belly fat) breast reconstruction that can share their story of the surgery and recovery?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 8 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • dorothy harder Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I havent had my reconstruction yet but I was thinking about this procedure. Because its all your own tissue. I just am hesitant cuz it seems you are getting so chopped up. But in the long run you'll have less infections or complications--so I'm told.

      7 comments
    • Erin Ely Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My Mom had a double mastectomy with a DIEP flap repair on Feb 1st. It was a 10 hour surgery in all. She spent one night in ICU and the three nights on the regular floor. She has had very little pain, the six drains bothered her more than anything. She does fatigue easily but she is getting...

      more

      My Mom had a double mastectomy with a DIEP flap repair on Feb 1st. It was a 10 hour surgery in all. She spent one night in ICU and the three nights on the regular floor. She has had very little pain, the six drains bothered her more than anything. She does fatigue easily but she is getting stronger everyday. They did not have to use any muscle for the flap so she maintains her abdominal strength. Also, she has no lymphadema due to only two nodes removed during the sentinel node biopsy. At her fist post op visit, five of the six drains were removed. I encourage women to consider this surgery if given the option. Yes, the surgery is long, but she will look amazing and be cancer free when all is said and done. I am Han RN and have been very pleased with her healing and progress. If anyone has any questions, feel free to contact me.

      5 comments
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