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Patsy's Story

About her story

"I know the feeling that you must be having if you've just been diagnosed or you have a loved one that's just been diagnosed with breast cancer."

In February 2002, Patsy discovered a lump and scheduled a mammogram with her doctor. The doctor performed a biopsy and diagnosed Patsy with Stage 2 breast cancer.

Patsy described her diagnosis, "like lightening had hit me. I was knocked to the ground."
But, like so many, Patsy relied on the strength of her family and friends to look at the hope in each day and to overcome breast cancer.

Hear Patsy's story and learn how she was not alone in her diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • lory nelson Profile

    I have a blog to share about my journey through my diagnosis and treatment that can enlighten and give hope. LoryNelson.blogspot.com

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I've read some of your blog Lory. It's great!!! I plan on doing one in the near future. It helps so much sharing what we've been through. For us....and for others as well.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Thank you for sharing your experience to help others.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    In Southern California, where can a 31-yr old go for mental health counseling. She has be told there is a need for her to have a mascetomy immediately.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      The American Cancer Society has a wealth of resources for people that have been diagnosed with cancer including support groups, counseling, etc. They have local offices all over the US. They also have a very helpful website that includes a toll-free number.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I just received my diagnosis two days ago but won't have specifics until Monday when I see my surgical oncologist. I'm wondering how others have coped with initial diagnosis?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 14 answers
    • View all 14 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I was in shock and hysterical. Thankfully, I had a friend who used to be an RN in a breast diagnostic clinc. She gave me answers, answer, and more answers. I always say, she is the one who "dragged me back from the edge of the cliff." Honestly, I started to develop a will of stainless steel...

      more

      I was in shock and hysterical. Thankfully, I had a friend who used to be an RN in a breast diagnostic clinc. She gave me answers, answer, and more answers. I always say, she is the one who "dragged me back from the edge of the cliff." Honestly, I started to develop a will of stainless steel and would make it through everything with humor and a positive attitude. I run a horse community email bulletin and since the horse people here are 95% women, I wanted to share my experience with them. I was able to show them, a breast cancer diagnosis was NOT a death sentence. I did not hide by diagnosis but wanted people to know this was the bald-headed-look-of-somebody-LIVING-with-and-beating breast cancer. You will develop your own unique way of coping. I made some great friends, my dear husband stood by me through thick and thin, God also shoved me along the way. I think every woman has to find their path which gives them comfort and peace. When things got really tough, I turned to my beautiful Arabian mare Kharrie. Her mane soaked up a lot of my tears and shared her gentle nature to help me during some pretty tough times. You will find your way.... we are just sharing a look at ours. Hang in there, you will make it. Take care.... and God's blessings. Sharon.

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      First I told my husband that was hard but telling my mom was the hardest part of this entire journey. Then I went into my room and did some praying and decided I could give myself a 24 hour pity party after that after it was time to go to war and kick cancer out of my body. 1 bubble bath and 2...

      more

      First I told my husband that was hard but telling my mom was the hardest part of this entire journey. Then I went into my room and did some praying and decided I could give myself a 24 hour pity party after that after it was time to go to war and kick cancer out of my body. 1 bubble bath and 2 beers later I set my jaw a never looked back. Today cancer I'm cancer free!!!!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Do sharp lines on a mammogram necessarily mean its cancer? Can a benign tumor from two years ago turn into cancer? Having lumpectomy Monday. So scared. BC took my mom, gma, and ggma.

    Asked by anonymous

    over 5 years 3 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I don't know what 'sharp lines' are either, sorry. I also can't tell you if a lump is cancer or not. You would need a biopsy for that. I can say that having it removed is a good thing. Try not to worry. I know it's hard when there is family history, but there are so many new advances in treatment...

      more

      I don't know what 'sharp lines' are either, sorry. I also can't tell you if a lump is cancer or not. You would need a biopsy for that. I can say that having it removed is a good thing. Try not to worry. I know it's hard when there is family history, but there are so many new advances in treatment now. Have you considered having genetic testing done? Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I used to do mammograms and don't think I recall seeing anything about sharp lines so I'm not sure what you're referring to.

      Comment

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