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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Lisa Doheny Profile

    Is it normal to have bone pain 3 months after my last chemo treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      If you are on any oral meds right now I know some can cause bone pain but I would sure check with your doctor on that.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I recommend checking with your doctor particularly if the pain is constant.

      Comment
  • ruby lee64 Profile

    How long is the sugery and stay in the hospital to remove the lumps following with radiation tx only?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Lumpectomy is day surgery -no stay unless a problem arises.

      Comment
    • Kansas Girl  Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I had a lumpectomy on Monday. They also did a sentinel node biopsy and inserted the port for chemo. Actual surgery was about 3 hours. Recovery was another couple of hours. I was home by 4:30.

      2 comments
  • Lauralee B Profile

    Just got the call yesterday telling me I have ductal cancer in excised biopsy- now awaiting scheduling for MRI and further Path results - what should I be doing, preparing for?? Any suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Calm down, fear of the unknown, and waiting are the hardest part of the treatment. You are on the road to being well. The best thing you can do now is exercise eat a well rounded diet and doing the things that make you the happiest. I threw myself into my work, gardened, rode my horse. Never...

      more

      Calm down, fear of the unknown, and waiting are the hardest part of the treatment. You are on the road to being well. The best thing you can do now is exercise eat a well rounded diet and doing the things that make you the happiest. I threw myself into my work, gardened, rode my horse. Never underestimate the old fashioned bubble bath I would add a glass of wine and some music. God Bless your journey

      2 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Lauralee,
      We all know the fear and terror you are experiencing right now. You have no idea what your future will be. This is pretty much your lowest, most dreadful, dark corner you will find yourself. As time goes along, you will gain more information, about this disease and how you are going...

      more

      Lauralee,
      We all know the fear and terror you are experiencing right now. You have no idea what your future will be. This is pretty much your lowest, most dreadful, dark corner you will find yourself. As time goes along, you will gain more information, about this disease and how you are going to be treated. I can assure you, even with this seemingly dire diagnosis, you will see light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel. You will come back out into the sunshine. Since you had the misfortune to receive this diagnosis, I am sincerely happy you found this group to help you through your treatment. We are all here to support each other. We all understand and are either in active treatment or have been through it. I can already give you some good news.... you have the most common form of breast cancer. You still have some other pieces of your diagnosis to be discovered.... grade, stage, etc. You have found a good, safe, place with us. Right now, you need to be extremely kind to yourself because it's a journey you are about to embark on. You will have a bunch of tests. You will have some or all of the following tests, MRI, CT Scan or PET Scan, Bone Scan, MUGA, and lots of bloodwork. None of these are painful more than a poke with a needle, so please don't stress about them beforehand. Approach this all with a warrior spirit, faith, and a whole lot of humor. I had Invasive ductal carcinoma and was treated 5 years ago. Even though many of us have had a similar diagnosis, each of our cancers are uniquely different. Thankfully, your doctors can tailor your treatment for your particular cancer. We may have had similar teatments but they are different. We will share our experience but it many not be exactly how you are going to react to the seemingly same treatment. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Susie Que Profile

    Is there anything that helps with neulasta? It gives me the most excruciating headache.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Probably ibuprofen is fine but definitely ask your onc

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Susie, if you haven't reported this to your Onc. I would be doing it. I didn't have that kind of side effect but we are all so different. Hang in there and talk to your doctor. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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